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An Iranian woman prays at St. Joseph's Cathedral in Tehran, Iran, a country where Christians and other religious groups have faced persecution. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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100 Iranians Remain Stranded In Austria Awaiting Asylum In The U.S.

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For refugees in Austria who choose to voluntarily go back to their countries of origin, a one-way trip to the Vienna International Airport marks the end of their journey in Europe. Hans Punz/AP hide caption

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Hans Punz/AP

A New Approach To Refugees: Pay Them To Go Home

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Aerial view over the rooftops of Vienna from the south tower of St. Stephen's Cathedral. Many Muslims say tensions are rising in Vienna. bluejayphoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Austrian Muslims Say Religious Intolerance Is Growing

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The leader of the Austria's far-right Freedom Party, Heinz-Christian Strache (left), and the leader of Austria's conservative People's Party, Sebastian Kurz, hold a joint press conference in Vienna on Saturday. Roland Schlager/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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An explosion tore through an Austrian gas pipeline hub at Baumgarten on Tuesday. At least one person was killed, and now onlookers fear the explosion could send shock waves through the European gas supply. Tomas Hulik/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sebastian Kurz, Austria's foreign minister and leader of the conservative Austrian People's Party (OeVP), arrives at his party headquarters on Oct. 13 in Vienna. The OeVP is currently leading in polls. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Austria Election: Center-Right Party Head Likely Next Prime Minister

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An Austrian court ruled on Friday that the "hate postings" against an Austrian politician must be deleted from Facebook worldwide. The case concerns posts insulting Eva Glawischnig, the leader of the Austrian Green party. Above, a poster featuring Glawischnig before legislative elections in September 2013. Alexander Klein/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Klein/AFP/Getty Images

Adolf Hitler was born in 1889 in an upstairs apartment of this house in the Austrian town of Braunau am Inn, near the border with Germany. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

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Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR

For Austria, A Tough Choice On What To Do With Hitler's Birthplace

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Austrian far-right candidate Norbert Hofer (L) and his rival Alexander Van der Bellen attend a post-selection TV talk with in Vienna on Dec. 4, 2016. Austrian far-right candidate Norbert Hofer on Sunday congratulated his opponent in presidential elections after projections indicated that he had lost. Helmut Fohringer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Helmut Fohringer/AFP/Getty Images

Sebastiaan De Vos, right, the general manager of Vienna's Magdas Hotel, recruits refugees like 24-year-old Ehsan Amini, left, to work at the hotel. Amini, who works in the Magdas cafe, fled Afghanistan and arrived in Austria five years ago. He's one of 20 refugees staffing the hotel. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis for NPR

The New Hotel In Vienna, Run By Refugees

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