John Kerry John Kerry

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov (left) and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (right) enter a news conference room Friday in Geneva to announce a cease-fire agreement for Syria. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images

British Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne, the United Kingdom's head financial official, leaves after making a statement at the Treasury in London on Monday. Stefan Rousseau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Rousseau/AFP/Getty Images

What To Know About Brexit Today

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U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (right), along with British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond (left), speak to reporters in London on May 12. They tried to assure European banks they won't be penalized for conducting legitimate business with Iran. Critics say it should not be up to the U.S. to encourage investment in Iran. Josh Lederman/AP hide caption

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Josh Lederman/AP

John Kerry's Awkward Push For Investment In Iran

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Secretary of State John Kerry pauses during his remarks about seeing the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park and Museum, the site of the 1945 atomic bombing, during a news conference at the conclusion of the G-7 Foreign Ministers' Meetings in Hiroshima on Monday. Jonathan Ernst/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Ernst/AFP/Getty Images

Secretary of State John Kerry spoke with NPR's Steve Inskeep at the State Department. Kerry said if Congress or a future president reverses a nuclear control agreement with Iran, U.S. credibility will suffer. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

U.S. Will Lose 'All Credibility' If Congress Rejects Nuclear Deal, Kerry Says

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Negotiators' Bonds, Commitment And Devotion To Details Got Iran Deal Done

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Iran, World Powers Reach Deal On Nuclear Program

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U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks at a news conference in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, on Saturday. Kerry said he's returning to nuclear negotiations with Iran with "important gaps" standing in the way of a deal. Brian Snyder/AP hide caption

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Brian Snyder/AP

Senate intelligence committee chairwoman Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., is again defending her report on CIA torture methods, which was set to be released this week. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP