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Shortage Of Addiction Counselors Further Strained By Opioid Epidemic

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A long vacant and blighted property was torn down in northwest Rutland this past year. The Rotary Club and other volunteers plan to erect a playground on the property as part of an effort to reclaim a neighborhood hard hit by drugs and crime. Nina Keck/VPR hide caption

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Nina Keck/VPR

Tragedy Moves A Community To Combat Drug Addiction

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A pharmacist counts pain pills. In an effort to curb the abuse of Oxycontin, Vicodin and other opioid painkillers, some health plans in Massachusetts now limit a patient's initial prescription to a 15-day supply, and plan to halve that number in February. Gabe Souza/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabe Souza/Getty Images

Insurers Hire Social Workers To Tackle The Opioid Epidemic

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LA Johnson/NPR

Anatomy Of Addiction: How Heroin And Opioids Hijack The Brain

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A "speedball" mix of heroin and cocaine has caused overdose deaths for decades. Today, high-risk blends may alternatively include heroin or opioid pain pills plus Klonopin, Clonidine, or Fentanyl. Marianne Williams Photography/Flickr RM/Getty Images hide caption

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Marianne Williams Photography/Flickr RM/Getty Images

Drug Cocktails Fuel Massachusetts' Overdose Crisis

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Gretchen Burns-Bergman (center) speaks Wednesday at a rally in front of the White House about ending mass incarceration of drug users. Angus Chen/NPR hide caption

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Angus Chen/NPR

Listen: on the scene with Moms United by the White House

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In Boston, Edmund Hassan, a deputy superintendent of emergency medical services, and his colleagues regularly revive people who have overdosed on opioids. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Reversing Opioid Overdoses Saves Lives But Isn't A Cure-All

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A nasal spray version of the overdose-reversing drug naloxone demonstrated at police headquarters in Quincy, Mass., in 2014. Gretchen Ertl/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Gretchen Ertl/Reuters/Landov

Price Soars For Key Weapon Against Heroin Overdoses

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Health worker Nathan Fields (left), Rep. Donna Edwards and Dr. Leana Wen show people how to use naloxone on a street corner in Sandtown, a Baltimore neighborhood where drug activity is common. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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Andrea Hsu/NPR

Baltimore Fights Heroin Overdoses With Antidote Outreach

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Heroin sold in the U.S., like this dose confiscated in Alabama last fall, is often cut with other drugs. Tamika Moore/AL.com/Landov hide caption

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Tamika Moore/AL.com/Landov

Illicit Version Of Painkiller Fentanyl Makes Heroin Deadlier

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