heroin heroin

Sabas Sanchez Jr. was better known among his neighbors in Madison, Neb., as "Gordo" — Spanish for chubby. He also had an oversized personality. His father keeps this tattered photo in his wallet. Bobby Caina Calvan/Heartland Reporting Project hide caption

toggle caption
Bobby Caina Calvan/Heartland Reporting Project

In America's Heartland, Heroin Crisis Is Hitting Too Close To Home

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/405936514/408680121" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Stacy Emminger holds the death certificate for her son, Anthony, who was addicted to heroin. His death was marked as a multidrug toxicity in Pennsylvania. Ben Allen/WITF hide caption

toggle caption
Ben Allen/WITF

States Lack Accurate Statistics On Widespread Heroin Use

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/405936768/408407236" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Shannon Rivers, a member of the Akimel O'odham tribe, lights a fire for the purification ceremony at the Coconino County jail. Inmates will help him put blankets over the sweat lodge structure, place heated rocks inside and pour water over them. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

toggle caption
Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Many Native American Communities Struggle With Effects Of Heroin Use

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/405936140/408159266" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Families harvest poppy bulbs in the Badakhshan province of Afghanistan. To collect the opium, they score the bulbs and let the milky substance ooze out. The dried residue contains about 10 percent morphine. David Guttenfelder/AP/National Geographic hide caption

toggle caption
David Guttenfelder/AP/National Geographic

Volunteer Patrick Pezzati searches yards in Turners Falls, Mass., for discarded heroin needles. Karen Brown/WFCR hide caption

toggle caption
Karen Brown/WFCR

A Rural Police Chief Asks Citizens To Help Pick Up Used Syringes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/401722597/402856156" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Volunteers search for needles and other drug paraphernalia along Church Street in Austin, Ind., in April. The region has recorded 142 new HIV cases since December, according to the state, in an outbreak tied to injected-opioid use. Seth Herald/Nurphoto/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption
Seth Herald/Nurphoto/Corbis

CDC Warns More HIV, Hepatitis C Outbreaks Likely Among Drug Users

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/401968600/402035073" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Frederica Boswell/NPR

It's Been A Hard 12-Step Road For Zanzibar's Heroin Addicts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/381625994/381783231" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Philadelphia, some drug users are selling clean needles from needle exchange programs on the street. Researchers say the black market isn't necessarily a bad thing. ImageZoo/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption
ImageZoo/Corbis

Needle Exchange Program Creates Black Market In Clean Syringes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/374560431/374737049" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tina Wolf demonstrates the use of naloxone to community members in Lindenhurst, N.Y., during an overdose prevention training. Georgia Dolan-Reilly (left) of the Suffolk County Prevention Resource Center helped with the training. Kevin Hagen for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Hagen for NPR

Teaching Friends And Family How To Reverse A Drug Overdose

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/371770229/373729998" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Several states distribute Naloxone hydrochloride, also called Narcan, to treat opium-based drug overdoses. But only one company manufactures the drug, and the price has spiked in recent years. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Toby Talbot/AP

'Magic' Overdose Drug Works, But Demand And Price On The Rise

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/283941697/284098682" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Soldiers in the Afghan National Army's 6th Kandak (battalion), 3rd company, search a local farmer's poppy field during a joint patrol with U.S. forces in Kandahar province in March of last year. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Burton/Getty Images