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Whitlee Hurd, the mother of five children, walks through her damaged home in northeast Houston. "This is my child's room but I can't have them sleep here now because the window is open," she says. "We told the maintenance man but he won't help us." Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center had 528 patients in the hospital as Harvey hit. A team of about 1,000 people tended to them and their families until reinforcements arrived Monday. Courtesy of MD Anderson Cancer Center hide caption

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Courtesy of MD Anderson Cancer Center

An 'Army Of People' Helps Houston Cancer Patients Get Treatment

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The Arkema plant in Crosby, Texas, is northeast of Houston. The company says it received reports of two explosions at the plant in the early hours of Thursday. Later, the county's emergency and safety officials insisted that nothing at the plant had exploded and that it was containers "popping." Google Maps hide caption

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Google Maps

Troy King navigates his boat through a flooded portion of Highway 90 in Houston on his way to rescue the Galvan family. Katie Hayes Luke for NPR hide caption

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Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Riding With A Rescue Mission In The Surreal, Perilous Texas Floods

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Planes are parked at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston on Tuesday. The airport, which had been closed since Hurricane Harvey made landfall, opened with limited service on Wednesday. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

With Rain Lessening In Houston, Airports And Ports Begin Opening

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Christine Garcia relaxes with her 8-year-old daughter Mia in the Channelview High School gym. It's been turned into an evacuation shelter for victims of flooding from Harvey. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Houston School Superintendent Says A Lot Of Work Ahead To Open Schools

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Parts of Houston remain flooded, but most hospitals are up and running, according to Darrell Pile, CEO of the Southeast Texas Regional Advisory Council, which manages the catastrophic medical operations center in Houston. Marcus Yam/LA Times/Getty Images hide caption

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Marcus Yam/LA Times/Getty Images

In Houston, Most Hospitals 'Up And Fully Functional'

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A police car patrols in downtown Houston on Wednesday following the first night of curfew after Harvey caused heavy flooding in the city. Mark Ralston /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston /AFP/Getty Images

William Scott (right) and his wife, Teresa, arrived at DaVita Med Center Dialysis in Houston on Tuesday morning, after missing William's appointment on Monday. "It's just good he got in here," she says. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

'This Is Surreal': Houston Dialysis Center Struggles To Treat Patients

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The National Hurricane Center predicts Harvey will move northeast from Louisiana. National Hurricane Center, National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration hide caption

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National Hurricane Center, National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration

Harvey Weakens Over Louisiana As Houston Copes With Record Rainfall

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Houston Police Sgt. Steve Perez was killed while trying to get through flood waters to report for work during Hurricane Harvey. Perez had been with the force for 34 years. Houston Police Department via AP hide caption

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Houston Police Department via AP

Dannie Harris and his sister Betty Shaw arrived at the convention center on Monday night. "When it first started the water rose and went down twice," Betty says of the water in their home. "So we thought maybe it was gonna stop. I started sweeping up." Dannie said "[Hurricane] Ike had just gone through." After they realized it wasn't going to subside they called for help. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

John Livious started over in Houston after being evacuated from New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina. Now, flooding has forced him to leave this new city. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

He Survived Hurricane Katrina. Now He's Had To Leave Houston

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