whales whales
Stories About

whales

The New England Aquarium team searching for right whales, at sunrise in the Bay of Fundy. Johanna Anderson and Kelsey Howe scan the waters while Marianna Hagbloom logs data, Amy Knowlton adjusts a GPS unit, and Brigid McKenna steers the Nereid. Murray Carpenter for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Murray Carpenter for NPR

In Changing Climate, Endangered Right Whales Find New Feeding Grounds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/652281781/655732019" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Humpback whales feed at the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary near Provincetown, Mass., in July 2014. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Scientists Are 'Spying On Whales' To Learn How They Eat, Talk And ... Walked?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/634456181/634645332" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The mother orca, known as J-35, pushes her dead calf to the surface last week off the coast of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. The infant orca died shortly after its birth, but its mother has been observed carrying it with her in the days afterward. Michael Weiss/Center for Whale Research via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Weiss/Center for Whale Research via AP

North Atlantic right whales are at risk of extinction because they often become ensnared in ropes used to guide lobster traps along the Northeastern U.S. and Canadian coastline. David L. Ryan/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David L. Ryan/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Humpback whales are among the animals that could be affected by seismic surveys for oil and gas. Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Seismic Surveys Planned Off U.S. Coast Pose Risk To Marine Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/586061334/587121735" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Leandro Teixeira and Richard Dubielzig of the University of Wisconsin - Madison open the whale eye package. Richard Dubielzig and Leandro Teixeira/University of Wisconsin-Madison hide caption

toggle caption
Richard Dubielzig and Leandro Teixeira/University of Wisconsin-Madison

All I Want For Christmas Is A Giant Whale Eye

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/572299263/573046527" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Researchers found that when narwhals like these were released from a net, the animals' heart rates dropped even as they were swimming rapidly. Flip Nicklin/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Flip Nicklin/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Stressed-Out Narwhals Don't Know Whether To Freeze Or Flee, Scientists Find

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569160429/569345976" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A blue whale, the largest animal on the planet, engulfs krill off the coast of California. Silverback Films/BBC/Proceedings of the Royal Society B hide caption

toggle caption
Silverback Films/BBC/Proceedings of the Royal Society B

How The Biggest Animal On Earth Got So Big

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/529505847/529804700" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A mother and calf humpback whale swim in the Exmouth Gulf in Western Australia. Fredrik Christiansen/Functional Ecology hide caption

toggle caption
Fredrik Christiansen/Functional Ecology

Recordings Reveal That Baby Humpback Whales 'Whisper' To Their Mothers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/525609671/525675229" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In a photograph taken Saturday, volunteers prop up a pilot whale at Farewell Spit in New Zealand. Overnight, more than 200 of the stranded whales returned to the sea. Marty Melville/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Marty Melville/AFP/Getty Images