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Former Equifax CEO Richard Smith came under harsh questioning Wednesday at a hearing of the Senate Banking Committee, the second of three congressional hearings on Equifax being held this week. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Senator To Ex-CEO: Equifax Can't Be Trusted With Americans' Personal Data

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Former Equifax CEO Richard Smith testifies about the company's massive data breach before a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on Tuesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Equifax Inc. headquarters are seen in Atlanta earlier this month. The credit reporting agency's interim CEO is apologizing to millions of consumers affected by a data breach. Mike Stewart/AP hide caption

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Mike Stewart/AP

"At this critical juncture, I believe it is in the best interests of the company to have new leadership to move the company forward," said Equifax Chairman and CEO Richard F. Smith. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Equifax is facing criticism because after the security incident it chose to create an entirely new domain for customers to check whether they were affected. Mike Stewart/AP hide caption

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Mike Stewart/AP

Equifax spent over $1 million last year on lobbying efforts, according to data compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics. Mike Stewart/AP hide caption

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Mike Stewart/AP

Equifax Breach Puts Credit Bureaus' Oversight In Question

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Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey, who plans to sue Equifax, called the breach "the most brazen failure to protect consumer data we have ever seen." bernie_photo/iStock hide caption

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bernie_photo/iStock

After Equifax Hack, Consumers Are On Their Own. Here Are 6 Tips To Protect Your Data

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Equifax's stock price went sliding by double digits on Friday as millions of Americans struggled to get answers from the company about whether they were affected and what to do next. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Fill out an application for a loan, and your wage history may go places you didn't expect. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images