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undocumented immigrants

The Pew Research Center estimates there are 7.5 million unauthorized workers in the United States concentrated in agriculture, construction and the hospitality industry. Karina Perez for NPR hide caption

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Karina Perez for NPR

Employers Struggle With Hiring Undocumented Workers: 'You Cannot Hire American Here'

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Changes to the expedited removal process allow low-level immigration officers to determine if an undocumented immigrant has been living in the U.S. for less than two years. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

In many cases, federal agents can request access to state DMV records by filling out a form. This is an example of a Homeland Security request that was made to the Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles in 2017. Georgetown Law hide caption

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Georgetown Law

ICE Uses Facial Recognition To Sift State Driver's License Records, Researchers Say

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California Gov. Gavin Newsom, pictured in January, must sign off on the latest state budget by June 15. The new $213 billion plan includes an expansion of the state's Medicaid program for low-income adults under the age of 26, regardless of immigration status. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

A sample Drive Only license from Connecticut. Courtesy of Connecticut Department of Motor Vehicles hide caption

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Courtesy of Connecticut Department of Motor Vehicles

Licensed Undocumented Immigrants May Lead To Safer Roads, Connecticut Finds

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In most states, undocumented immigrants with kidney failure have to receive dialysis as an emergency treatment in hospital emergency rooms. Some advocates say kidney transplants for undocumented immigrants would be a cheaper way to treat the problem. JazzIRT/Getty Images hide caption

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JazzIRT/Getty Images

Transplants A Cheaper, Better Option For Undocumented Immigrants With Kidney Failure

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The New York Times report says that at least two supervisors at Trump National Golf Club Bedminster in New Jersey were aware that two female employees were not in the country legally. Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images

Arleene Correa Valencia works on a painting in her latest series: In Times of Crisis, En Tiempo de Crisis. Rachael Bongiorno for NPR hide caption

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Rachael Bongiorno for NPR

After The Wildfires: Artist Captures Plight Of Napa's Undocumented Workers

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First lady Melania Trump talks with Border Patrol agents as she visits a processing center of a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility in Tucson, Ariz. Thursday. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

The U.S. government is conducting a test run of the 2020 census in Rhode Island's Providence County, where many noncitizens living in Central Falls, R.I., say they're planning to avoid participating in the national head count. RussellCreative/Getty Images hide caption

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RussellCreative/Getty Images

Many Noncitizens Plan To Avoid The 2020 Census, Test Run Indicates

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Along this road are several businesses in Dalton, Ga., that cater to the town's large Hispanic population. As many as 4,000 DACA recipients live in Dalton, and many work in the carpet industry. Kevin D. Liles for NPR hide caption

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Kevin D. Liles for NPR

Why Employers In Georgia Are Watching The Immigration Debate Closely

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Young worshippers at Erez Baptist Church in Duncanville, Texas, gather for a midweek music service. The congregation, less than a year old, consists almost entirely of Hispanic immigrants and their children. Tom Gjelten/NPR hide caption

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Tom Gjelten/NPR

Some Christian Leaders Say Deportations Would Jeopardize Their Churches

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Luis Pedrote-Salinas, seen at a July news conference, is suing the Chicago Police Department for including him in a gang database, an inaccurate designation that he thinks cost him the chance for protection under the DACA program. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

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Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

Activists: Gang Database Disproportionately Targets Young Men Of Color

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