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A bit of lapis lazuli — a rich blue pigment — is trapped within a central tooth's dental tartar on this lower jaw of a European woman who died sometime between A.D. 997 and 1162. Christina Warinner/Science Advances hide caption

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Christina Warinner/Science Advances

A Blue Clue In Medieval Teeth May Bespeak A Woman's Artistry Circa A.D. 1000

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American conservationist Jeff Allen (center) directs Iraqi technicians laying mortar between ancient bricks at the site of Babylon. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

In Iraq, A Race To Protect The Crumbling Bricks Of Ancient Babylon

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Assyrian artifacts are displayed at Iraq's National Museum in Baghdad in 2016. The $30 million sale of a 3,000-year-old Assyrian relief is sparking concern that similar artifacts will be looted. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images

The Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project says the intact shipwreck was discovered at a depth of more than 1 mile, where the scarcity of oxygen helped preserve the ancient vessel. Black Sea MAP/EEF Expeditions hide caption

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Black Sea MAP/EEF Expeditions

The Great Synagogue in Vilnius, Lithuania's capital, was built in the 17th century. Vilnius served as a center of Jewish life in Eastern Europe before World War II. Collection of Zusya Efron, Center for Jewish Art, Hebrew University of Jerusalem hide caption

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Collection of Zusya Efron, Center for Jewish Art, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Excavation Of Lithuania's Great Synagogue Highlights A 'Painful Page' From History

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This ancient piece of bread, more than 14,000 years old, is changing what archaeologists thought they knew about the history of food and agriculture. Amaia Arranz-Otaegui hide caption

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Amaia Arranz-Otaegui

Roman marbles are on display in the San Giovanni metro station, part of Line C of Rome's subway, in 2017. Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images

Rome's Subway Expansion Reveals Artifacts From The Ancient Past

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A restorer works on the mold of a horse in the ruins of a Roman villa recently found by Italian carabinieri (police) during an investigation into tunnels dug by thieves in Civita Giuliana, next to the archaeological site of Pompeii. Carlo Hermann/Kontrolab/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Carlo Hermann/Kontrolab/LightRocket via Getty Images

A 360-degree camera is used to document the Khe Min Ga Zedi temple in Bagan, Myanmar. Kieran Kesner for CyArk hide caption

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Kieran Kesner for CyArk

3D Scans Help Preserve History, But Who Should Own Them?

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A skull discovered at a sacred Aztec temple. A new study analyzed DNA extracted from the teeth of people who died in a 16th century epidemic that destroyed the Aztec empire, and found a type of salmonella may have caused the epidemic. Alexandre Meneghini/AP hide caption

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Alexandre Meneghini/AP

A farmer plows his field with an ox-pulled plow in China's Guangxi province. Archaeologists think that domesticated farm animals increased inequality in some ancient societies. Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images

From Cattle To Capital: How Agriculture Bred Ancient Inequality

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The Sissano Lagoon was part of Papua New Guinea devastated by a tsunami in 1998. Researchers used evidence from after that tsunami to compare to a tsunami thousands of years ago. Channel 7 TV Sydney via AP hide caption

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Channel 7 TV Sydney via AP

A scans of the astrolabe reveal not only the emblems on its face (left) but also the degree markings (right) that would have aided sailors in navigation. University of Warwick hide caption

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University of Warwick

Hobby Lobby agreed earlier this month to a forfeiture of smuggled artifacts. Holly Hildreth /Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Holly Hildreth /Moment Editorial/Getty Images

Israeli Authorities Arrest Antiquities Dealers In Connection With Hobby Lobby Scandal

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Patrick McGovern, scientific director of the Biomolecular Archaeology Project at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, delves into the early history of fermentation in his latest book. Courtesy of Alison Dunlap hide caption

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Courtesy of Alison Dunlap

Max Planck Institute paleoanthropologist Jean-Jacques Hublin examines the new finds at Jebel Irhoud, in Morocco. The eye orbits of a crushed human skull more than 300,000 years old are visible just beyond his fingertip. Shannon McPherron/Nature hide caption

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Shannon McPherron/Nature

315,000-Year-Old Fossils From Morocco Could Be Earliest Recorded Homo Sapiens

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A quartzite colossus possibly of Ramses II and limestone bust of Seti II have been discovered at the ancient Heliopolis archaeological site in the Matariya area of Cairo. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Israeli archaeologists are excavating ruins of a residential quarter dating back to the 2nd century B.C. at the Nebi Samuel site in the West Bank. According to an Israeli-Palestinian agreement, the status of the West Bank – and the artifacts found there – are to be negotiated in eventual peace talks. Daniel Estrin/NPR hide caption

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Daniel Estrin/NPR

In West Bank, Israeli And Palestinian Archaeologists Both Lay Claim To Heritage

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Tiny minerals in the clay of this jar hold information about the strength of the Earth's magnetic field at the time the jar was fired, thousands of years ago. Image courtesy of Oded Lipschits hide caption

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Image courtesy of Oded Lipschits