archaeology archaeology

A farmer plows his field with an ox-pulled plow in China's Guangxi province. Archaeologists think that domesticated farm animals increased inequality in some ancient societies. Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images

From Cattle To Capital: How Agriculture Bred Ancient Inequality

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The Sissano Lagoon was part of Papua New Guinea devastated by a tsunami in 1998. Researchers used evidence from after that tsunami to compare to a tsunami thousands of years ago. Channel 7 TV Sydney via AP hide caption

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Channel 7 TV Sydney via AP

A scans of the astrolabe reveal not only the emblems on its face (left) but also the degree markings (right) that would have aided sailors in navigation. University of Warwick hide caption

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University of Warwick

Hobby Lobby agreed earlier this month to a forfeiture of smuggled artifacts. Holly Hildreth /Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Holly Hildreth /Moment Editorial/Getty Images

Israeli Authorities Arrest Antiquities Dealers In Connection With Hobby Lobby Scandal

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Patrick McGovern, scientific director of the Biomolecular Archaeology Project at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, delves into the early history of fermentation in his latest book. Courtesy of Alison Dunlap hide caption

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Courtesy of Alison Dunlap

Max Planck Institute paleoanthropologist Jean-Jacques Hublin examines the new finds at Jebel Irhoud, in Morocco. The eye orbits of a crushed human skull more than 300,000 years old are visible just beyond his fingertip. Shannon McPherron/Nature hide caption

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Shannon McPherron/Nature

315,000-Year-Old Fossils From Morocco Could Be Earliest Recorded Homo Sapiens

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A quartzite colossus possibly of Ramses II and limestone bust of Seti II have been discovered at the ancient Heliopolis archaeological site in the Matariya area of Cairo. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Israeli archaeologists are excavating ruins of a residential quarter dating back to the 2nd century B.C. at the Nebi Samuel site in the West Bank. According to an Israeli-Palestinian agreement, the status of the West Bank – and the artifacts found there – are to be negotiated in eventual peace talks. Daniel Estrin/NPR hide caption

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Daniel Estrin/NPR

In West Bank, Israeli And Palestinian Archaeologists Both Lay Claim To Heritage

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Tiny minerals in the clay of this jar hold information about the strength of the Earth's magnetic field at the time the jar was fired, thousands of years ago. Image courtesy of Oded Lipschits hide caption

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Image courtesy of Oded Lipschits

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute excavate the East Gallery of Denisova Cave in Siberia in August 2010. With ancient bone fragments so hard to come by, being able to successfully filter dirt for the DNA of extinct human ancestors can open new doors, research-wise. Bence Viola/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology hide caption

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Bence Viola/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Dust To Dust: Scientists Find DNA Of Human Ancestors In Cave Floor Dirt

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Archaeologist Layla Salih looks around the ancient site of Nimrud, in northern Iraq, outside Mosul. The Islamic State captured the area in 2014 and destroyed many of its archaeological treasures that date back 3,000 years. The extremist group was recently driven out of Nimrud, allowing Salih and others to come back and survey the extensive damage. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham/NPR

In Northern Iraq, ISIS Leaves Behind An Archaeological Treasure In Ruins

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The new Grand Egyptian Museum, seen here near the pyramids of Giza in June 2015, is due to open late next year. It will display thousands of artifacts, many of them never shown publicly before. Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images

Fit For A King: Grand Museum Will Showcase Tut And Egypt's Ancient Culture

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A member of a whaling crew waves a flag at the start of the butchering of a just-captured bowhead whale in the outskirts of Barrow, Alaska, in 1998. Luciana Whitaker/CON/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

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Luciana Whitaker/CON/LatinContent/Getty Images

Chad Sheridan, a cellarmaster at Lakefront Brewery and expert on braggots, helped re-create a recipe for an ancient alcoholic brew discovered in a 2,500-year-old burial plot in what's now Germany. Courtesy of Bettina Arnold hide caption

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Courtesy of Bettina Arnold