bitcoin bitcoin

The Justice Department has charged Zoobia Shahnaz, 27, with bank fraud and money laundering. She allegedly converted money from credit cards into cryptocurrencies including bitcoin and transferred it abroad in support of ISIS. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

A screenshot of the warning screen from a purported ransomware attack on a laptop in Beijing. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Schiefelbein/AP

From Kill Switch To Bitcoin, 'WannaCry' Showing Signs Of Amateur Flaws

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/528570788/528570789" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Some workers in low-income countries are choosing bitcoin, a virtual currency powered by blockchain technology, to send money to their families. It's cheaper, faster and doesn't require a middleman. Andrew Baker/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Baker/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Entrepreneur Craig Wright says he is the creator of the bitcoin crypto-currency. In this 2014 file photo, a man arrives for the Inside Bitcoins conference and trade show in New York. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Lennihan/AP

For Sex Industry, Bitcoin Steps In Where Credit Cards Fear To Tread

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/456786212/459871103" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript