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A cosplayer dressed as tinkerbell. Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images for ReedPOP hide caption

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Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images for ReedPOP

Copyright small claims court

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F. Scott Fitzgerald, Virginia Woolf, Ernest Hemingway, Franz Kafka and many more authors and artists have 1925 works entering the public domain on January 1. Above, a first edition of The Great Gatsby at the London International Antiquarian Book Fair in London in 2013. Oli Scarff/Getty Images hide caption

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Oli Scarff/Getty Images

Software company Oracle accuses Google of illegally copying its code when the tech giant developed its popular Android smartphone system. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Google And Oracle's Decade-Long Copyright Battle Reaches Supreme Court

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A man reads a book on his e-book reader device. In July, Microsoft will be deleting its e-book library and ceasing all e-book sales. Joerg Sarbach/AP hide caption

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Joerg Sarbach/AP

Microsoft Closes The Book On Its E-Library, Erasing All User Content

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Naruto, a macaque, took this self-portrait in 2011 with a camera owned by photographer David Slater. The photo has been the subject of a years-long copyright battle. David Slater via Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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David Slater via Wikimedia Commons

Taylor Swift is one of many artists urging Congress to update copyright laws, which they argue don't fairly pay for music available online. Kevin Mazur/WireImage/Getty hide caption

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Kevin Mazur/WireImage/Getty

Why Taylor Swift Is Asking Congress To Update Copyright Laws

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Jimmy Page (right) and Robert Plant (left) of Led Zeppelin performing in the U.K. in 1975. Mick Gold/Redferns hide caption

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Mick Gold/Redferns

LISTEN: Opening riff, Led Zeppelin's 'Stairway To Heaven'

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Star Trek fans dress as Klingons during the Destination Star Trek event at ExCel on Oct. 3, 2014, in London. Ben A. Pruchnie/Getty Images hide caption

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Ben A. Pruchnie/Getty Images

Is Klingon A Living Language? That's For (Human) Courts To Decide

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A macaque took this self-portrait in 2011 with a camera owned by photographer David Slater. PETA says the monkey owns the copyright; Slater says he does. The U.S. Copyright Office says no one can, and a federal judge has now said it would be up to Congress to extend copyright privileges to animals. David Slater via Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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David Slater via Wikimedia Commons

Musician David Lowery of Camper Van Beethoven and Cracker says Spotify streamed his songs without his permission. Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images

Spotify Faces Class Action For Copyright Infringement

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A service technician uses a diagnostic device in front of a diesel engine in a Volkswagen Touran in an auto repair shop in Hanover, Germany. Researchers have been pushing for freedom to learn more about the code inside cars in the fallout of the VW software-rigging scandal. Julian Stratenschulte/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Julian Stratenschulte/EPA/Landov

Heath Miller of the Pittsburgh Steelers catches the ball on the 1-yard line against defender Brandon Flowers of the San Diego Chargers during Monday's game in San Diego. Donald Miralle/Getty Images hide caption

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Donald Miralle/Getty Images

Twitter's Suspension Of Sports Media Revives Debate Over Fair Use

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Farmer Dave Alford can't fix his own tractors like this one because it's run by software with proprietary digital locks. Laura Sydell/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sydell/NPR

DIY Tractor Repair Runs Afoul Of Copyright Law

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A Chinese court says that Qiaodan Sports' logo of a basketball player's silhouette does not infringe on Air Jordan's famous "jumpman." Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

The Trademark Woes Of Michael Jordan (And Many Others) In China

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Comedian Ari Shaffir performs at the 2015 Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in June in Manchester, Tenn. Shaffir has said fellow comedian Carlos Mencia stole his joke about who would build a fence on the U.S.-Mexican border. Copyright on jokes is difficult to prove, and it turned out two other comedians had made similar jokes as well. John Davisson/Invision/AP hide caption

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John Davisson/Invision/AP

Everyone knows how to sing "Happy Birthday to You." But performing the song in movies or on TV requires payment of sometimes hefty licensing fees. Now the song is at the heart of a lawsuit. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

'Happy Birthday' Hits Sour Notes When It Comes To Song's Free Use

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The e-book's original cover image was used without permission, according to a lawsuit filed against Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Apple. Amazon via The Daily Beast hide caption

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Amazon via The Daily Beast

An Ohio Couple Would Like To Forget 'A Gronking To Remember'

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