overdose overdose
Stories About

overdose

Matt Capelouto, whose daughter died from a fentanyl overdose, speaks at a news conference outside the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Tuesday, April 18, 2023. Capelouto is among dozens of protesters who called on the Assembly to hear fentanyl-related bills as tension mounts over how to address the fentanyl crisis. (AP Photo/Tran Nguyen) Tran Nguyen/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Tran Nguyen/AP

In 2023 fentanyl overdoses ravaged the U.S. and fueled a new culture war fight

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1220881380/1221970655" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Critics say U.S. government training videos like this one from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention exaggerate fears of fentanyl exposure among police. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention hide caption

toggle caption
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Cops say they're being poisoned by fentanyl. Experts say the risk is 'extremely low'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1175726650/1176508672" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Emily Ligawiec (right) and Officer John Cacela take weekly pottery classes together in Ware, Mass. Rather than arrest Ligawiec last winter when she took heroin and stole her mom's car, he offered her help. Karen Brown/New England Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Karen Brown/New England Public Radio

Police Offering Drug Recovery Help: 'We Can't Arrest Our Way Out Of This Problem'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/802318886/804056824" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The MX908 can check for the presence of fentanyl mixed with other drugs and such testing may help prevent overdoses. Sarah Mackin of the Boston Public Health Commission prepares the machine for testing some samples. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Jesse Costa/WBUR

Built For Counterterrorism, This High-Tech Machine Is Now Helping Fight Fentanyl

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/780794194/783237362" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Patrick Semansky/AP

In Massachusetts last July, several Franklin County Jail inmates were watched by a nurse and a corrections officer after receiving their daily doses of buprenorphine, a drug that helps control opioid cravings. By some estimates, at least half to two-thirds of today's U.S. jail population has a substance use or dependence problem. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Elise Amendola/AP

County Jails Struggle With A New Role As America's Prime Centers For Opioid Detox

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/716398909/716647673" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Paramedic Larrecsa Cox (center) and her quick-response team, including police Officer Stephanie Coffey (left) and Pastor Virgil Johnson (right), check in at the home in Huntington, W.Va., of someone who was revived a few days before from an overdose. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah McCammon/NPR

Knocking On Doors To Get Opioid Overdose Survivors Into Treatment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/657894138/660135684" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Some sixty "Opiod Overdose Kits" have been added defibrillator boxes in Bridgewater State University dorms and academic buildings like this one. Tovia Smith / NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Tovia Smith / NPR

On College Campuses, Making Overdose Medication Readily Available

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/658471440/659611194" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images

Bystanders To Fatal Overdoses Increasingly Becoming Criminal Defendants

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/623327129/625259885" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Surgeon General recommends more Americans carry naloxone, the opioid overdose antidote. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media

Reversing An Overdose Isn't Complicated, But Getting The Antidote Can Be

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/607760827/609019604" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hospital emergency departments are tasked with saving the lives of people who overdose on opioids. Clinicians and researchers hope that more can be done during the hospital encounter to connect people with treatment. FangXiaNuo/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
FangXiaNuo/Getty Images

A recent study in Delray Beach identified at least six sober homes on this street alone. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Greg Allen/NPR

Beach Town Tries To Reverse Runaway Growth Of 'Sober Homes'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537882989/542569880" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

First responders in Washington, D.C., bring naloxone on every emergency call. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Shelby Knowles/NPR

First Responders Spending More On Overdose Reversal Drug

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/541626627/542286101" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A public restroom on the platform of the Central Square MBTA station in Cambridge, Mass., which people have used as a place for getting high. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Jesse Costa/WBUR

Public Restrooms Become Ground Zero In The Opioid Epidemic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/526523520/527452886" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lisa, a client at the AAC Needle Exchange and Overdose Prevention Program in Cambridge, Mass. Nearly five years after an opioid overdose she still limps — possibly because of damage the drug cocktail did to her nerves or muscles. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Robin Lubbock/WBUR

What Doesn't Kill You Can Maim: Unexpected Injuries From Opioids

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/523452905/525110198" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People in their mid-40s to mid-60s are more likely than any other group to be prescribed opioids with benzodiazepines. Both kinds of drugs can hamper breathing and mixing them is especially risky. Erwin Wodicka/iStock hide caption

toggle caption
Erwin Wodicka/iStock

In Prince's Age Group, Risk Of Opioid Overdose Climbs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476902228/477072223" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Imodium is a popular brand of the drug loperamide. Because loperamide is increasingly being abused by opioid users, some toxicologists think it should have the same sales restrictions as pseudoephedrine. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Thousands of parents have lost sons and daughters across the country to an epidemic of accidental drug overdoses. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

When A Loved One Dies Of Overdose, What Happens To The Family?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/464463631/467253515" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Heroin sold in the U.S., like this dose confiscated in Alabama last fall, is often cut with other drugs. Tamika Moore/AL.com/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Tamika Moore/AL.com/Landov

Illicit Version Of Painkiller Fentanyl Makes Heroin Deadlier

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/434618809/434975526" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tina Wolf demonstrates the use of naloxone to community members in Lindenhurst, N.Y., during an overdose prevention training. Georgia Dolan-Reilly (left) of the Suffolk County Prevention Resource Center helped with the training. Kevin Hagen for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Hagen for NPR

Teaching Friends And Family How To Reverse A Drug Overdose

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/371770229/373729998" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript