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While your holiday meal might consist of turkey that's deep-fried, braised or roasted, the turkeys who've been featured in music through the years have inspired pop culture crazes. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

'Let's Turkey Trot': Festive Music About Fowl

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Hydrochar derived from poultry waste was produced in a lab at Ben-Gurion University in Israel. The hydrochar can be made into briquettes, which can be used as charcoal for cooking food. Juliana Neumann hide caption

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Juliana Neumann

Ocellated turkeys stand out for their bright blue heads and iridescent feathers. They're still around the Yucatan today. Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

The average wholesale price of turkeys was $1.35 per pound in mid-November. But the retail price of frozen tom turkeys has fallen to an average of 87 cents a pound. Why? Because grocers know cheap turkeys draw customers into the store. Larry Crowe/AP hide caption

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Larry Crowe/AP

A 40-pound tom turkey flaps his wing as Chris Conley carries him to a pen at Raymond's Turkey Farm in Methuen, Mass., on Friday. The farm raises approximately 20,000 broad-breasted white turkeys per year. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola/AP

The turkeys at Kate Stillman's farm don't have to be loaded on a trailer and driven hundreds of miles this year. They now meet their ends on the same farm where they lived their lives. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Chris Arnold/NPR

For More Local Turkeys To Hit Holiday Tables, You Need An Abattoir

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Turkeys sit in a barn in Sonoma, Calif. An estimated 46 million turkeys are cooked and eaten during Thanksgiving meals in the U.S. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

President Barack Obama, with daughters Sasha, second from left, and Malia, right, bestows a presidential pardon on Popcorn, the turkey, in a White House Thanksgiving tradition. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

You talking to me? (A turkey on New York's Staten Island; who's probably just as intimidating, if not more, than those in California.) Jonathan Fickies /Landov hide caption

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Jonathan Fickies /Landov