microbiome microbiome

Hadza man eating honeycomb and larvae from a beehive. Matthieu Paley/National Geographic hide caption

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Matthieu Paley/National Geographic

Is The Secret To A Healthier Microbiome Hidden In The Hadza Diet?

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An image of Penicillium colonies. The white colony is a mutant similar to the mold found in Camembert cheese. The green ones are the wild form. Courtesy of Benjamin Wolfe hide caption

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Courtesy of Benjamin Wolfe

NASA astronaut Kate Rubins floats in the International Space Station in September 2016, wearing a spacesuit decorated by patients recovering at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. NASA Johnson/Flickr hide caption

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NASA Johnson/Flickr

A Microbe Hunter Plies Her Trade In Space

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Bacteriophages, in red, look like tiny aliens, with big heads and skinny bodies. They use their "legs" to stick to and infect a bacterial cell, in blue. Biophoto Associates/Science Source hide caption

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Biophoto Associates/Science Source

Your Gut's Gone Viral, And That Might Be Good For Your Health

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Colored scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Escherichia coli bacteria (green) taken from the small intestine of a child. E. coli are rod-shaped bacteria that are part of the normal flora of the human gut. Stephanie Schuller/Science Source hide caption

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Stephanie Schuller/Science Source

Once scientists grew these Staphylococcus lugdunensis bacteria in a lab dish, they were able to isolate a compound that's lethal to another strain commonly found in the nose that can make us sick — Staphylococcus aureus. Mostly Harmless/Flickr hide caption

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Mostly Harmless/Flickr

'Nose-y' Bacteria Could Yield A New Way To Fight Infection

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The John C. Sullenger Vineyard at Nickel & Nickel Winery, Napa Valley, Calif. Nickel & Nickel collaborated with scientists to collect wine samples and identify the bacteria and fungi in them by sequencing microbial DNA. Jason Tinacci/Courtesy of Nickel & Nickel hide caption

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Jason Tinacci/Courtesy of Nickel & Nickel

It's not just kombucha and yogurt: Probiotics are now showing up in dozens of packaged foods. But what exactly do these designer foods with friendly flora actually offer — besides a high price tag? Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

(Top left to right) Cladosporium werneckii, Aspergillus fumigates and Aspergillus fumigateurs. (Bottom left to right) Sepedonium, Aspergillus niger and Fusarium. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention hide caption

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention