microbiome microbiome

Feces contain digested food residue and a wide variety of microorganisms, mostly bacteria, that are adapted to life in the intestines. The gases the microbes produce could help doctors and scientists track and understand changes related to health. Scimat Scimat/Photo Researchers/Getty Images hide caption

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Scimat Scimat/Photo Researchers/Getty Images
Vidhya Nagarajan for NPR

Kids, Allergies And A Possible Downside To Squeaky Clean Dishes

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The Pseudomonas stutzeri bacterium, commonly found in soil, was the most prevalent subway microbe. Lower Manhattan was its prime hangout. Mason/Cell Systems 2015 hide caption

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Mason/Cell Systems 2015

Biologist Rob Knight, co-founder of the American Gut Project, recently moved the project to the University of California, San Diego's School of Medicine. Casey A. Cass/University of Colorado hide caption

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Casey A. Cass/University of Colorado

Lactobacillus acidophilus, which is one variety of the genus Lactobacillus is one of the common active cultures found in yogurt and in the human gut. Scimat Scimat/Getty Images/Photo Researchers hide caption

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Scimat Scimat/Getty Images/Photo Researchers

Rob Knight, co-founder of the American Gut Project at the University of Colorado in Boulder, works in the lab where the samples are processed. The American Gut Project hide caption

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The American Gut Project

After a quick swipe and online registration, these test tubes were ready to ship back to the lab at the University of Colorado in Boulder for sequencing and analysis. Katherine Harmon Courage for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Harmon Courage for NPR

A turkey vulture makes quick work of a dead rabbit at Martin Luther King Jr. Regional Shoreline park in Oakland, Calif. Sebastian Kennerknecht/Minden/Corbis hide caption

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Sebastian Kennerknecht/Minden/Corbis

How Can Vultures Eat Rotten Roadkill And Survive?

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

What's In His Kiss? 80 Million Bacteria

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