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archeology

A Przewalski mare with her foal at the Highland Wildlife Park in Kingussie, Scotland, in 2013. It turns out that Przewalski's horses are actually feral descendants of the first horses that humans are known to have domesticated, around 5,500 years ago. Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images

Why The Last 'Wild' Horses Really Aren't

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Here's what archaeologists think the Upward Sun River camp in what is now central Alaska looked like 11,500 years ago. Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature hide caption

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Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature

Ancient Human Remains Document Migration From Asia To America

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A neolithic jar from Khramis Didi-Gora, Georgia. The country has long prided itself on its winemaking tradition. A new analysis of ancient Georgian jars confirms that tradition goes back 8,000 years. Courtesy of the Georgian National Museum hide caption

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Courtesy of the Georgian National Museum

Georgian Jars Hold 8,000-Year-Old Winemaking Clues

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This June 2008 photo shows an ancient Aboriginal rock carving in the Burrup Peninsula in the north of Western Australia. Greg Wood/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Wood/AFP/Getty Images

Archaeologists working at the Templo Mayor site of Aztec ruins in Mexico City, in August 2015. Scientists say the remains of women and children are among those found at a main trophy rack of human skulls, known as "tzompantli." Hector Montano/AP hide caption

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Hector Montano/AP

Two pictures show the minaret (top) of Aleppo's ancient Umayyad mosque, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, on April 16, 2013, and the rubble (bottom) after it was blown up on April 24, 2013. Jalal al-Halabi,Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jalal al-Halabi,Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP/Getty Images

Some Take Massive Risks To Save Syria's Cultural Heritage

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Graduate student Zach Dunseth carefully excavates wine jugs found in the ruins of a Canaanite palace that dates back to about 1700 B.C. Eric H. Cline/Courtesy of Eric H. Cline/George Washington University hide caption

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Eric H. Cline/Courtesy of Eric H. Cline/George Washington University

The metal in an Egyptian iron bead dating from around 3,300 BC has been found to have originated from space, according to analysis. Here, the bead is seen in (clockwise from top left) a photograph, a CT cross-section view, a model of nickel oxides, and a model in which blue areas represent the rich presence of nickel inside the bead. The Open University/University of Manchester hide caption

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The Open University/University of Manchester