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Heat waves, remote work, iPhones

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Pragadish Kalaivanan, a marketing analyst, got up extra early to dress for work before his first days back at the office in Boston. He's among those happy to still be able to work two days from home, as the company's new hybrid policy allows. Tovia Smith/NPR hide caption

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Tovia Smith/NPR

Returning to the office, a moment of joy for some. Others, would rather stay home

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Wells Fargo announced that employees who have been working remotely for nearly two years will return to the office on March 14, 2022, on a flexible hybrid schedule. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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'Where is my office anyway?' As COVID recedes, remote workers prepare to head back

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Renuka Iyer, chief human resources officer for the World Resources Institute, sits in an empty office. The environmental nonprofit's staff has been working remotely since March 2020. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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Andrea Hsu/NPR

Working In Sweatpants May Be Over As Companies Contemplate The Great Office Return

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The obstacles and hardships facing working mothers are not new, but the pandemic has given them more visibility. SDI Productions/Getty Images hide caption

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SDI Productions/Getty Images

'This Is Too Much': Working Moms Are Reaching The Breaking Point During The Pandemic

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Get A Comfortable Chair: Permanent Work From Home Is Coming

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Many parents suddenly have the task of making sure their kids learn while adjusting to a new life of managing working from home. Artur Debat/Getty Images hide caption

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Coronavirus Triple Duty: Working, Parenting, And Teaching From Home

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Laundry Between Emails: Working From Home Goes Viral In The Time Of Coronavirus

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Martín Elfman for NPR

Stay-At-Home Dads Still Struggle With Diapers, Drool, Stigma And Isolation

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Some companies find that real-time technology demands have forced them to curb their work-from-home policies, even as a growing number of employers continue to embrace remote work. Dean Mitchell/Getty Images/iStock hide caption

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Dean Mitchell/Getty Images/iStock

Some Employers Are Rethinking Telework, Citing A Need For Better Collaboration

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NPR's Steve Henn works from his Silicon Valley home. He says his fragmented schedule allows him to fit in time with his daughters. "It works for me because, in the end, the hours balance out — and I am in control of my time," he says. Steve Henn/NPR hide caption

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Steve Henn/NPR