jewish food jewish food

A rabbi (center) supervises the production of Passover matzos at the Streit's factory on New York's Lower East Side, circa 1960s. This Passover will be Streit's last one at the landmark location. AP hide caption

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AP

How The Matzo Crumbles: Iconic Streit's Factory To Leave Manhattan

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Wrapped in gold and silver foil, chocolate gelt are often handed out as a little treat for children (and adults) during Hanukkah. Turns out, the tradition is rooted in real money. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Hanukkah History: Those Chocolate Coins Were Once Real Tips

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Sweet or salty? Historically among Eastern European Jews, how they liked their gefilte fish depended on where they lived. This divide created a strictly Jewish geography known as "the gefilte fish line." Claire Eggers/NPR hide caption

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Claire Eggers/NPR

A woman in front of Mrs. Stahl's knish shop in Brooklyn's Brighton Beach neighborhood where author Laura Silver went as a child. Courtesy of the University Press of New England hide caption

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Courtesy of the University Press of New England

The Humble Knish: Chock-Full Of Carbs And History

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The holes in matzo give the cracker its characteristic crunch, Odelia Cohen/iStockphoto hide caption

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Odelia Cohen/iStockphoto

A Love Letter To Matzo: Why The Holey Cracker Is A Crunch Above

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While traditional cholents feature meat and beans cooked for a whole day, some modern versions, like this one, use vegetable protein and a quick braise. rusvaplauke/Flickr hide caption

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rusvaplauke/Flickr

Cholent: The Original Slow-Cooked Dish

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Judge Michael Zusman's bialys are topped with roasted onions, poppy seeds and coarse salt. Daniel Zwerdling/NPR hide caption

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Daniel Zwerdling/NPR

A Judge's Cookbook Reveals The Secrets Of Bialys And Bagels

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Nick Wiseman, partner at DGS Delicatessen, inspects the kitchen as an employee prepares pastrami sandwiches for lunch. Daniel M.N. Turner/NPR hide caption

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Daniel M.N. Turner/NPR

Hear David Greene's Story

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Russ and Daughters, which opened on the Lower East Side in 1914, specializes in smoked fish. Courtesy of Jen Snow, Russ and Daughters hide caption

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Courtesy of Jen Snow, Russ and Daughters

Family Keeps Jewish Soulfood Alive At New York 'Appetizing' Store

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