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Verizon crews pump water from an access tunnel in Manhattan in 2012 after flooding from Superstorm Sandy knocked out underground Internet cables. Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images

Power lines hang from a pole in a Brooklyn neighborhood on March 15 in New York City. As U.S. officials step up sanctions on Russian intelligence for its interference in the 2016 elections, members of the Trump administration have accused Russia of a cyber-assault on the domestic energy grid and other key parts of America's infrastructure. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Miami Pedestrian Walkway Collapses Onto Road, Killing At Least 4

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Tribal leaders worry that they will be left out of discussions surrounding major decisions affecting tribes and their land, like that of the Navajo Nation which covers parts of Arizona, Utah and New Mexico. Jeff Overs/BBC News for Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Overs/BBC News for Getty Images

Vehicles are seen at the toll bridge of the Holland Tunnel as snow covers the road during a snowstorm on Feb. 9, 2017, in Jersey City, N.J. More states are turning to tolls as a way to fund long-standing transportation needs. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

More States Turning To Toll Roads To Raise Cash For Infrastructure

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On the domestic front in 2018, President Trump is expected to focus on immigration, infrastructure, welfare and health care. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

An aerial view shows the flooded neighborhood of Juana Matos in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Catano, Puerto Rico, on Friday. The island could be without power for months, complicating relief efforts. Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump speaks during a visit to Federal Emergency Management Agency headquarters in Washington, D.C., on Aug. 4. Michael Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Reynolds/Getty Images

President Trump delivers a speech Wednesday in Cincinnati on transportation and infrastructure projects. But his plan still leaves a lot to be desired. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

A streetcar rides along Woodward Avenue on Friday in Detroit — the city's first in 61 years. The QLine project was led by private businesses and philanthropic organizations in partnership with local, state and the federal government. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

A new water tank in Strong City, Kan., (at right) sits next to one that was part of an old leaky system on a hill just outside the city limits. Frank Morris/KCUR hide caption

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Frank Morris/KCUR

Rural Trump Voters Embrace The Sacrifices That Come With Support

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There are 59,000 structurally deficient bridges around the country. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Engineers Say Tax Increase Needed To Save Failing U.S. Infrastructure

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Water released so far by emergency spillways at Oroville Dam in Northern California washed away roadways, eroded the landscape and flooded communities downstream. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

An aerial photo released Saturday by the California Department of Water Resources shows the damaged spillway with eroded hillside in Oroville, Calif. William Croyle/California Department of Water Resources via AP hide caption

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William Croyle/California Department of Water Resources via AP

Signs Of Hope At Oroville Dam, After Overflow Sparked Large Evacuation Sunday

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A road repair blocks traffic in Springfield, Ill. as Congress tries to decide how to pay for President Trump's ambitious spending plan to rebuild roads, bridges, railroads and airports. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP