infrastructure infrastructure

On the domestic front in 2018, President Trump is expected to focus on immigration, infrastructure, welfare and health care. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

An aerial view shows the flooded neighborhood of Juana Matos in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Catano, Puerto Rico, on Friday. The island could be without power for months, complicating relief efforts. Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump speaks during a visit to Federal Emergency Management Agency headquarters in Washington, D.C., on Aug. 4. Michael Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Reynolds/Getty Images

President Trump delivers a speech Wednesday in Cincinnati on transportation and infrastructure projects. But his plan still leaves a lot to be desired. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

A streetcar rides along Woodward Avenue on Friday in Detroit — the city's first in 61 years. The QLine project was led by private businesses and philanthropic organizations in partnership with local, state and the federal government. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

A new water tank in Strong City, Kan., (at right) sits next to one that was part of an old leaky system on a hill just outside the city limits. Frank Morris/KCUR hide caption

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Frank Morris/KCUR

Rural Trump Voters Embrace The Sacrifices That Come With Support

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There are 59,000 structurally deficient bridges around the country. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Engineers Say Tax Increase Needed To Save Failing U.S. Infrastructure

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Water released so far by emergency spillways at Oroville Dam in Northern California washed away roadways, eroded the landscape and flooded communities downstream. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

An aerial photo released Saturday by the California Department of Water Resources shows the damaged spillway with eroded hillside in Oroville, Calif. William Croyle/California Department of Water Resources via AP hide caption

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William Croyle/California Department of Water Resources via AP

Signs Of Hope At Oroville Dam, After Overflow Sparked Large Evacuation Sunday

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A road repair blocks traffic in Springfield, Ill. as Congress tries to decide how to pay for President Trump's ambitious spending plan to rebuild roads, bridges, railroads and airports. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel speaks with members of the media after meeting with President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York on Wednesday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

From Immigration To Infrastructure, Big-City Mayors Draw Up Wish List For Trump

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San Francisco Bay area voters recently approved a sales tax increase to upgrade the aging BART system. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP

Voters Backed Transit Funds. Will Congress OK Trump Infrastructure Plan?

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An image of President-elect Donald Trump appears Wednesday on a television screen on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Business leaders are taking a wait-and-see approach to his administration. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

In Economy As In Business, Trumponomics May Mean Building Big Things

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A worker uses a blowtorch on an interchange bridge in Englewood, Colo., on Aug. 25. Construction workers for infrastructure projects around the country are in short supply. Seth McConnell/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Seth McConnell/Denver Post via Getty Images

Agreeing On More Money For Roads, Bridges May Be Easier Than Finding Workers

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Pleasure boats are docked along the Erie Canal in Fairport, N.Y. Some are asking whether the canal is worth subsidizing now that it's no longer a major commercial waterway. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

A Piece Of The Past, A Price In The Present: Paying For The Erie Canal

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Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton delivered competing economic speeches this week. Mary Altaffer and Chuck Burton/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer and Chuck Burton/AP

How Did Trump's And Clinton's Economic Policy Speeches Compare?

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Two SEPTA Silverliner V trains, the newest railcars in the SEPTA fleet, wait in a Philadelphia train station in 2014. All Silverliner V cars have been pulled from service for repairs to significant structural problems. Gregory Adams/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Gregory Adams/Moment Editorial/Getty Images

Flint, Mich., resident Jacqueline Pemberton holds her granddaughter at a press conference announcing a lawsuit against government officials in November. Pemberton is one of six plaintiffs claiming that officials violated constitutional rights by providing lead-tainted water to residents. Jake May/mlive.com/Landov hide caption

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Jake May/mlive.com/Landov

Lead Poisoning In Michigan Highlights Aging Water Systems Nationwide

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