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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said they had a constructive White House meeting with President Trump on infrastructure on Tuesday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

A Chinese-backed power plant under construction in 2018 in the desert in the Tharparkar district of Pakistan's southern Sindh province. Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images

Why Is China Placing A Global Bet On Coal?

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New York's Brooklyn Bridge is one of more than 47,000 bridges identified as "structurally deficient," according to the annual report from the American Road and Transportation Builders Association. Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images

Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., who chairs the House Transportation Committee wants to work with the White House on a bipartisan infrastructure bill. At the same time, his panel is investigating a lease given to the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

A father and his daughter cross a street under renovations as part of a U.S. aid grant in the village of al-Badhan, north of Nablus in Israeli occupied West Bank in August 2018. Jaafar Ashtiyeh/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jaafar Ashtiyeh/AFP/Getty Images

Palestinian School And Sewage Projects Unfinished As U.S. Cuts Final Bit Of Aid

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The journey up the west coast of Norway, from the city of Kristiansand in the south to the city of Trondheim, now takes about 21 hours and requires seven ferry crossings. The Norwegian Public Roads Administration plans a nearly $40 billion transport project that would cut travel time in half. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

Norway Embarks On Its Most Ambitious Transport Project Yet

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The interior of the DMZ train, a three-car tourist train. It is decorated with words such as "love," "peace" and "harmony," in several languages. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

South Korea Sends 1st Train In Plan To Reconnect With North

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An annual report by the American Road and Transportation Builders Association notes that there are now nearly 56,000 bridges nationwide that are structurally deficient. Both Democrats and Republicans say they're willing to work together on a plan to rebuild the nation's roads, bridges, transit and water systems. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Bridging The Partisan Divide: Can Infrastructure Unite Democrats And Republicans?

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A screenshot from a video posted by the City of Lynchburg shows water flowing over Lakeside Drive, which runs atop the College Lake Dam in the Virginia city. City of Lynchburg via Facebook/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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City of Lynchburg via Facebook/Screenshot by NPR

Verizon crews pump water from an access tunnel in Manhattan in 2012 after flooding from Superstorm Sandy knocked out underground Internet cables. Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images

Power lines hang from a pole in a Brooklyn neighborhood on March 15 in New York City. As U.S. officials step up sanctions on Russian intelligence for its interference in the 2016 elections, members of the Trump administration have accused Russia of a cyber-assault on the domestic energy grid and other key parts of America's infrastructure. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Miami Pedestrian Walkway Collapses Onto Road, Killing At Least 4

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Tribal leaders worry that they will be left out of discussions surrounding major decisions affecting tribes and their land, like that of the Navajo Nation which covers parts of Arizona, Utah and New Mexico. Jeff Overs/BBC News for Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Overs/BBC News for Getty Images