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CNN's Jim Acosta walks into federal court in Washington on Wednesday to attend a hearing on a legal challenge against the Trump administration. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Decision Delayed To Friday In CNN Suit Over White House Revoking Acosta's Press Pass

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All Things Considered host Mary Louise Kelly (right) records a standup with producer Becky Sullivan at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang ahead of a military parade marking the 70th anniversary of North Korea's founding. David Guttenfelder for NPR hide caption

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David Guttenfelder for NPR

A woman holds up a Nicaraguan newspaper that published images of some of the people who have died in recent protests there, interrupting Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega at the opening of a dialogue between the government and opposition and civic groups in Managua, on May 16. Alfredo Zuniga/AP hide caption

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Alfredo Zuniga/AP

Nicaragua's Embattled Government Tries To Silence Independent Media

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Kenya's opposition leader Raila Odinga holds up a Bible as he swears himself in as the "people's president" on Tuesday in Nairobi. Authorities shut the top three independent TV channels ahead of the event. They remain closed. Patrick Meinhardt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Meinhardt/AFP/Getty Images

As Government Ignores Court Order, Kenya's Media Blackout Continues

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College students protest to defend press freedom in Manila on Wednesday, after the government cracked down on Rappler, an independent online news site. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

Afghan policemen stand guard near an entrance gate at the Shamshad TV Network after gunmen who were reportedly disguised as policemen stormed the media outlet in Kabul on Tuesday. Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images

Cambodia's Prime Minister Hun Sen speaks to garment workers during a visit to a factory outside Phnom Penh on Aug. 30. His government has slapped the English-language Cambodia Daily with a $6.3 million tax bill and ordered it to pay by Sept. 4. If it doesn't, Hun Sen said, it should "pack up and go." Heng Sinith/AP hide caption

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Heng Sinith/AP

Former New York Times journalist Judith Miller along with her legal team including Robert Bennett, right, leaves U.S. District Court in Washington in 2007. Miller was jailed for nearly three months after refusing to testify in a CIA leak investigation. Kevin Wolf/AP hide caption

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Kevin Wolf/AP

President Trump, shown here in an ad for a Chinese magazine in Shanghai, continues to attack the integrity of reporters who challenge him — even as he keeps making false claims. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

Cumhuriyet newspaper readers protested the government's detaining of its editor-in-chief and others this week. An Istanbul court has ordered nine of the paper's journalists to be held in prison pending trial. Basin Foto Ajansi/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Basin Foto Ajansi/LightRocket via Getty Images

The government of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, shown here addressing the U.N. General Assembly last month, says a newspaper story that civilian officials warned the military of global isolation due to support of militant groups was "fabricated." Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

After A Sensitive Story, A Pakistani Journalist Is Barred From Leaving

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Lilian Tintori, second row center, in white top, the wife of jailed opposition leader Leopoldo Lopez, takes part in a demonstration in Caracas on Aug. 31. Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro vowed Tuesday to jail opposition leaders if they incite violence during upcoming protests seeking a referendum on removing him from power. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

Du Daozheng browses his copy of The Annals of the Chinese Nation, or Yanhuang Chunqiu, in July at his home in Beijing. The 93-year old publisher, a stalwart of the Communist Party's embattled liberal wing, announced publication of the magazine would end after government officials ordered a leadership reshuffle and seized its offices. Gerry Shih/AP hide caption

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Gerry Shih/AP

Amid Crackdown, China's Last Liberal Magazine Fights For Survival

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Yahia Kalash, the head of the journalists union, holds a candle during a vigil on May 24 for the recent victims of an EgyptAir crash. Kalash and two other board members of the journalists union are facing trial on allegations they published false news and harbored journalists wanted by authorities. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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Amr Nabil/AP

In Egypt's Broad Crackdown, Prominent Journalists Are Now Facing Trial

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