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As more doctors' offices give patients electronic access to their medical records, both patients and their physicians are asking: Exactly how much of your medical record should you get to see? Runstudio/Getty Images hide caption

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Runstudio/Getty Images

DNA isolated from a small sample of saliva or blood can yield information, fairly inexpensively, about a person's relative risk of developing dozens of diseases or medical conditions. GIPhotoStock/Cultura RF/Getty Images hide caption

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GIPhotoStock/Cultura RF/Getty Images

In theory, "direct primary care" should result in better health for patients and lower health care costs overall. But some analysts say that approach just encourages the worried well to get more care than they need. BraunS /Getty Images hide caption

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BraunS /Getty Images

Dr. Adam McMahan has been practicing medicine in rural Alaska for three years. It's the kind of intimate, full-spectrum family medicine the 34-year-old doctor loves. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

In Rural Alaska, A Young Doctor Walks To His Patient's Bedside

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Advocates of paying a family doctor a flat monthly fee for office visits and some lab work say it saves patients money when coupled with a high-deductible insurance plan. Ridofranz/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Ridofranz/Getty Images/iStockphoto

While incarcerated, Mark Baskerville says he suffered five diabetic comas. He says he's now doing a better job of managing his health. Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR hide caption

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Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR

Helping Ex-Inmates Stay Out Of The ER Brings Multiple Benefits

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Like many small towns, Bridgton, Maine, had few resources for people seeking treatment for opioid abuse. Susan Sharon/MPBN hide caption

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Susan Sharon/MPBN

A Small Town Bands Together To Provide Opioid Addiction Treatment

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The unique medical program at the University of California, Berkeley is housed in its School of Public Health. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Dr. Max Lebow examines the ear of 4-year-old Charlotte Anderson at Reliant Immediate Care in Los Angeles. Charlotte's mom brought her to the urgent care clinic because Charlotte was having balance problems. Benjamin Brian Morris for NPR hide caption

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Benjamin Brian Morris for NPR

Can't Get In To See Your Doctor? Many Patients Turn To Urgent Care

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