WWII WWII

Eighty-two-year-old Zosia Radzikowska, from Krakow, survived the Holocaust by pretending to be Christian. A retired criminal law professor, Radzikowska is an active member of Krakow's small but flourishing Jewish community. Esme Nicholson for NPR hide caption

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Esme Nicholson for NPR

Auschwitz Remembrance Is Tinged With Tension Over Poland's Holocaust Speech Law

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Chicken blinchiki from Kachka. Leela Cyd/Courtesy of Flatiron Books hide caption

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Leela Cyd/Courtesy of Flatiron Books

Kachka: The Word That Saved A Family During WWII And Inspired A Chef

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Former Auschwitz guard Reinhold Hanning on the last day of his trial for being an accessory to the murder of 170,000 people at the camp in Nazi-occupied Poland. The 94-year-old was found guilty. Bernd Thissen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bernd Thissen/AFP/Getty Images

An honor guard soldier stands next to a monument in Bucharest, Romania, in Feb. 2012, that bears the names of Jews killed when the SS Struma — the ship they were on as refugees on their way to what was then Palestine — was sunk by a Soviet torpedo in the Black Sea. All but one of the 779 people on board died. Vadim Ghirda/AP hide caption

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Vadim Ghirda/AP

Grace Srinivasan plays Noor Inayat Khan, an Indian-American Muslim woman who spied for the British during World War II, in a new docudrama about her life. Jonathan Mount/Unity Productions Foundation hide caption

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Jonathan Mount/Unity Productions Foundation

One Woman, Many Surprises: Pacifist Muslim, British Spy, WWII Hero

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Hiroo Onoda, who wouldn't surrender for nearly three decades and continued to battle with villagers in the Philippines, in March 1974 after he was convinced to give up. Kyodo /Landov hide caption

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Kyodo /Landov