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Family members of Tony Hughes, one of the 11 victims found at a serial killer's apartment, comfort each other during a remembrance vigil held at Junea Park in Milwaukee in 1991. Bill Waugh/AP Photo hide caption

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Bill Waugh/AP Photo

Opinion: Remember the victims, not the killer

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Visitors to a cinema showing the latest "Minions: The Rise of Gru" movie get their tickets checked in Beijing. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

Opinion: In China, movie villains don't get away

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A woman sits in a theater in Irvine, Calif., waiting for a movie to start, on Sept. 8. A COVID-19 vaccine could unleash pent-up spending from households that have mostly avoided activities like going to the gym during the coronavirus pandemic. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Vaccine Could Unlock Trillions In Spending, Leading To 'Biden Boom'

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Top to bottom: must-watch TV shows that people are binge-watching around the world: The Bad Kids in China, PasiĆ³n de Gavilanes in Colombia, and Tehran in Israel. Youtube/ Screenshots by NPR hide caption

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Youtube/ Screenshots by NPR

Movie theaters remain closed as stay-at-home orders continue in many parts of the U.S. due to the coronavirus pandemic. Chris Pizzello/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/AP

TV, Movies And Coronavirus

The coronavirus pandemic is affecting all parts of the entertainment industry. Sam talks to writer and comedian Jenny Yang and camera operator Jessica Hershatter, whose jobs are on hold due to shutdowns. Also, Sam and LA Times entertainment reporter Meredith Blake discuss television and streaming. And joining Sam for a special edition of Who Said That is Shea Serrano, staff writer for The Ringer and author of the book Movies (and Other Things).

TV, Movies And Coronavirus

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Sam Polinsky, known by his lucha libre wrestling moniker Sam Adonis, enters the ring waving his Trump American flag and riling up the audience in Mexico City. James Fredrick for NPR hide caption

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James Fredrick for NPR

In Mexico, The Crowd Loves To Hate Pro Wrestler Who Plays Trump Supporter

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Comedian Jesse Appell performs at a club in Beijing. Appell won a scholarship in 2012 to study comedy in China and has been performing on the country's small but growing stand-up comedy circuit. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

So An American Comic Walks Into A Chinese Bar ...

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