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In this Oct. 31 photo, a man has his face painted to represent efforts to defeat facial recognition. It was during a protest at Amazon headquarters over the company's facial recognition system. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

A body camera from Taser is seen during a press conference on Sept. 24, 2014 in Washington, DC. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

Police Are Investing In New Technology. 'Thin Blue Lie' Asks, 'Does It Work?'

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The 10-Year Challenge has gone viral on platforms like Facebook, but some worry about how the data will be used. Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images

Could The 10-Year Challenge Be Putting Your Data At Risk?

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The American Civil Liberties Union says that Amazon Rekognition, facial recognition software sold online, inaccurately identified lawmakers and poses threats to civil rights — charges that Amazon denies. Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images

An image from a presentaton by Amazon's Ranju Das shows a demonstration of real-time facial recognition and tracking. Das said the video came from a traffic cam in Orlando, Fla., where police were in a pilot program of Amazon's Rekognition service. Amazon Web Services Korea via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Amazon Web Services Korea via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

In this video, Amazon's Ranju Das demonstrates real-time facial recognition to an audience. It shows video from a traffic cam that he said was provided by the city of Orlando, where police have been trying the technology out. Amazon Web Services Korea via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Amazon Web Services Korea via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

Orlando Police Testing Amazon's Real-Time Facial Recognition

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North Korea has been secretly selling facial recognition software, a new report states. This photo shows a German official identified by a computer with an automatic facial recognition system that was not mentioned in the report. Markus Schreiber/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AFP/Getty Images

An Axon body camera worn by an officer with the Los Angeles Police Department. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Body Camera Maker Weighs Adding Facial Recognition Technology

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NEC Corporation of America already supplies many American jurisdictions with still photo facial recognition. Now the company says it's getting law enforcement inquiries about its real-time facial recognition. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

Real-Time Facial Recognition Is Available, But Will U.S. Police Buy It?

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SenseTime's technology is able to identify specific attributes of vehicles and people. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Facial Recognition In China Is Big Business As Local Governments Boost Surveillance

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Apple's Philip Schiller unveiled the Face ID feature in September. Less than a week after the iPhone X was released, a Vietnamese security firm said it had cracked Face ID using a specially made mask. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Security Firm Says Extremely Creepy Mask Cracks iPhone X's Face ID

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Phil Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing, announces features of the new iPhone X on Sept. 12 at the Steve Jobs Theater on the new Apple campus in Cupertino, Calif. The phone's new ability to unlock itself using a scan of its owner's face inspired a strong, divided reaction. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

iPhone X's Face ID Inspires Privacy Worries — But Convenience May Trump Them

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Apple executive Philip Schiller presents a wireless charging system, displayed with the new iPhone X and Apple Watch alongside cordless headphones called AirPods. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images
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Some People Are Great At Recognizing Faces. Others...Not So Much

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Charles Camiel looks into the camera for a facial recognition test before boarding his JetBlue flight to Aruba at Logan International Airport in Boston. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbock/WBUR

Facial Recognition May Boost Airport Security But Raises Privacy Worries

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Eight different real faces were shown to a monkey. The images were then reconstructed using analyzing electrical activity from 205 neurons recorded while the monkey was viewing the faces. Courtesy of Doris Tsao/Cell Press hide caption

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Courtesy of Doris Tsao/Cell Press

Cracking The Code That Lets The Brain ID Any Face, Fast

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A child takes a facial recognition test in which he is asked to match the face on the top to one of the faces on the bottom. Jesse Gomez and Kalanit Grill-Spector at the Vision and Perception Neuroscience Lab/Science hide caption

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Jesse Gomez and Kalanit Grill-Spector at the Vision and Perception Neuroscience Lab/Science

Brain Area That Recognizes Faces Gets Busier And Better In Young Adults

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A New York Police Department security camera set up along a street in New York City on Aug. 26. Robert Alexander/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Alexander/Getty Images

It Ain't Me, Babe: Researchers Find Flaws In Police Facial Recognition Technology

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Facebook's Moments app uses facial recognition technology to group photos based on the friends who are in them. Amid privacy concerns in Europe and Canada, the versions launched in those regions excluded the facial recognition feature. Facebook hide caption

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Facebook

Researchers found that passport screeners have an error rate of about 15 percent when they're evaluating whether faces match passport photos. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images