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Panamanian Foreign Minister Isabel de Saint Malo de Alvarado and Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi toast after signing a joint statement on establishing diplomatic relations in June 2017 in Beijing. Greg Baler/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baler/Pool/Getty Images

China Lures Taiwan's Latin American Allies

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El Salvador's Foreign Minister Carlos Castaneda, left, and China's Foreign Minister Wang Yi stand together at a ceremony in Beijing to mark the beginning of diplomatic relations between the two countries on Tuesday. The move leaves Taiwan with one less ally. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Workers secure a rope to the shore at the Patoutzu Fishing Harbour in Keelung on Tuesday, as boats come into dock ahead of the arrival of Typhoon Maria. Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images

Vocalist Freddy Lim of Taiwanese metal group Chthonic performing at Download Festival in Leicestershire, England, in 2013. Kevin Nixon/Metal Hammer Magazine/Future Publishing via Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Nixon/Metal Hammer Magazine/Future Publishing via Getty Images

'Born Independent,' Taiwan's Defiant New Generation Is Coming Of Age

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In this photo taken and released Friday by the Taiwan Ministry of National Defense, a Taiwanese Air Force fighter aircraft (left) flies near a Chinese People's Liberation Army Air Force bomber. Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen said this week that the island will step up security to respond to military threats from China. Taiwan's Ministry of National Defense via AP hide caption

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Taiwan's Ministry of National Defense via AP

Taiwan Loses 2 More Allies To China And Scrambles Jets To Track Chinese Bomber Drills

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China plans to hold live-fire exercises next Wednesday in the Taiwan Strait. On Thursday, a Chinese navy fleet including the aircraft carrier Liaoning (in background) held a parade in the South China Sea. VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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VCG via Getty Images

A tourist takes photos of Tower 101 in Taipei in 2013. Policy experts say the Taiwan Travel Act is a provocation for China because more visits to Taiwan by high-ranking U.S. officials could help boost the island's international profile. Mandy Cheng/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandy Cheng/AFP/Getty Images

Rescue and emergency workers block off a street where a building came off its foundation, the morning after a 6.4 magnitude quake hit the eastern Taiwanese city of Hualien, on Wednesday. Paul Yang/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Yang/AFP/Getty Images

Same-sex marriage supporters hug outside Taiwan's legislature in Taipei on Wednesday after a landmark decision was announced that paves the way for the island to become the first place in Asia to legalize gay marriage. Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images

The Liaoning, China's only aircraft carrier, sails during military drills in the Pacific on Dec. 24. Taiwan's defense minister warned on Dec. 27 that enemy threats were growing daily after China's aircraft carrier and a flotilla of other warships passed south of the island in an exercise. On Wednesday, the carrier traveled through the Taiwan Strait. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen, center, is escorted by security staff before departing from Taoyuan airport on Saturday. Tsai Ing-wen left for the United States on her way to Central America, a trip that will be closely watched by Beijing. Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images

After President-elect Donald Trump's conversation with Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen (right), and his subsequent suggestion that the "One China" policy could be reconsidered, a Chinese government spokesman warned that if the policy "is interfered with or damaged, then the healthy development of China-U.S. relations and bilateral cooperation in important areas is out of the question." Evan Vucci, Chiang Ying-ying/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci, Chiang Ying-ying/AP

A magazine featuring U.S. President-elect Donald Trump is seen at a bookstore in Beijing on Monday. The headline reads, "How will businessman Trump change the world?" Beijing is "seriously concerned" by Trump's suggestion that he could drop Washington's "One China" policy, officials said Monday. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

President-elect Donald Trump spoke last Friday with Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen. In her first public comments, Tsai said Tuesday that observers should not read too much into the conversation. "I do not foresee major policy shifts in the near future," she told Western journalists. Evan Vucci, Chiang Ying-ying/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci, Chiang Ying-ying/AP

Taiwan's President: Phone Call With Trump 'Doesn't Mean A Policy Shift'

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Copies of local Chinese magazines at a news stand in Shanghai on Nov. 14, almost a week after Donald Trump was elected president. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images