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reproductive health

Women protest in Buenos Aires on Thursday in support of decriminalizing abortion as Argentine lawmakers debated the measure, which was defeated in the Senate. Natacha Pisarenko/AP hide caption

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Natacha Pisarenko/AP

For Abortion Activists In Argentina, A Campaign Waged Online Faces A Disconnect

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Staff members hold an informal meeting before opening the STD free clinic in February in Portland, Maine. The CDC recorded more than 2 million cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis nationally in 2016 — the highest number of reported cases yet, officials say. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images

Thousands of abortion-rights opponents demonstrate in Dublin on March 10. NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto via Getty Images

Ireland's Abortion Referendum Is Proving Deeply Divisive

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President Trump shakes hands with Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar after he is sworn in by Vice President Pence on Jan. 29. Major reproductive health organizations are voicing concerns about the Trump administration's new approach to federal family-planning grants, which may reduce the role of Planned Parenthood and place greater emphasis on "natural family planning." Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Melvine Ouyo is a reproductive health nurse at Family Health Options Kenya. She visited Washington, D.C., to discuss how the clinic has lost funding because it would not agree to the terms of President Trump's executive order banning U.S. aid to any health organization in another country that provides, advocates or makes referrals for abortions. Emily Matthews/NPR hide caption

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Emily Matthews/NPR

Cecile Richards attends the 2017 Glamour Women of the Year Awards at Kings Theatre on Monday, Nov. 13, 2017, in New York. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

Noemi Padilla, 47, recently left Tampa Women's Health, an independent clinic in Tampa, Fla. She worked there as a surgical nurse and assisted on abortion procedures up to about 23 weeks gestation. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

The Anti-Abortion Group That's Urging Clinic Workers to Quit Their Jobs

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A scientist holds a bioprosthetic mouse ovary made of gelatin with tweezers. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine hide caption

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Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Scientists One Step Closer To 3-D-Printed Ovaries To Treat Infertility

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EVATAR is a book-size lab system that can replicate a woman's reproductive cycle. Each compartment contains living tissue from a different part of the reproductive tract. The blue fluid pumps through each compartment, chemically connecting the various tissues. Courtesy of Northwestern University hide caption

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Courtesy of Northwestern University

Device Mimicking Female Reproductive Cycle Could Aid Research

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Dr. Paul Turek, a urologist with clinics in San Francisco and Beverly Hills, says one group of friends who got vasectomies together, during the NCAA spring basketball tournament, seemed to recover more quickly than usual, and require fewer pain pills. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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April Dembosky/KQED

March Madness Vasectomies Encourage Guys To Take One For The Team

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Four sheep cloned from the same genetic material as Dolly roam the paddocks in Nottingham, England. The University of Nottingham hide caption

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The University of Nottingham

'Sister Clones' Of Dolly The Sheep Are Alive And Kicking

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New York City's health department launched the "Maybe the IUD" campaign this week, aimed at increasing awareness about the IUD as a highly effective and low-maintenance option for birth control. iStock hide caption

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iStock

Protesters rally outside the Supreme Court during the March for Life on Jan. 25, 2013, in Washington, D.C. Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images

Big Question For 2015: Will The Supreme Court Rule On Abortion?

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Women who underwent sterilization surgery at a government-run camp were hospitalized in the Indian state of Chhattisgarh after 13 patients died following the procedure. Anindito Mukherjee/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Anindito Mukherjee/Reuters/Landov

New research could be promising for infertile men. Scientists were able to make immature sperm cells from skin cells. Their next challenge is to make that sperm viable. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

'Provocative' Research Turns Skin Cells Into Sperm

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Family Doctors Consider Dropping Birth Control Training Rule

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