medical tests medical tests

Scientists have developed a smartphone app to measure sperm count at home. Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School hide caption

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Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

The hemoglobin A1C test for blood sugar, a standard assay for diabetes, may not perform as well in people with sickle cell trait, a study finds. fotostorm/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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fotostorm/Getty Images/iStockphoto

The A1C Blood Sugar Test May Be Less Accurate In African-Americans

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Stanford bioengineering professor Manu Prakash looked to a children's toy to create a hand-powered centrifuge for processing blood tests. Kurt Hickman /Stanford University hide caption

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Kurt Hickman /Stanford University

Children's Whirligig Toy Inspires a Low-Cost Laboratory Test

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A multi-million dollar effort to produce a test to guide treatment for a potentially lethal skin cancer recently fell apart after the scientific investigator discovered that the commercial antibodies he was using were unreliable. Cultura RM Exclusive/Peter Mulle/Getty Images hide caption

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Cultura RM Exclusive/Peter Mulle/Getty Images

Parkinson's disease, smoking, certain head injuries and even normal aging can influence our sense of smell. But certain patterns of loss in the ability to identify odors seem pronounced in Alzheimer's, researchers say. CSA Images/Color Printstock Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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CSA Images/Color Printstock Collection/Getty Images

A Sniff Test For Alzheimer's Checks For The Ability To Identify Odors

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"I'm afraid there's a growing sense that the path to health is through testing," says Dr. H. Gilbert Welch, a Dartmouth Institute internist who has written books on the pitfalls of overdiagnosis. Encouraging the worried well to order their own blood tests feeds that mindset, he says. TEK Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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TEK Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

A medical researcher prepares tests for various diseases including Zika. Arnulfo Franco/AP hide caption

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Arnulfo Franco/AP

How Best To Test For Zika Virus?

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Studies show that having too many tests done too frequently is a recipe for getting sick, not staying healthy. Medicimage/Science Source hide caption

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Medicimage/Science Source

Magnified 25,000 times, this digitally colorized scanning electron micrograph shows Ebola virus particles (green) budding from an infected cell (blue). CDC/NIAD hide caption

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CDC/NIAD

Blood Test For Ebola Doesn't Catch Infection Early

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