medical tests medical tests
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Bill Of The Month: A Tale Of 2 CT Scanners — One Richer, One Poorer

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The HQ-40 drone, made by Tuscon, Ariz.-based Latitude Engineering, can carry samples for medical testing in a refrigerated container. Johns Hopkins School of Medicine hide caption

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Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Liz Moreno thought she was done paying for her back surgery in 2015. But a $17,850 bill for a urine test showed up nine months later. Her father, Paul Davis, a retired doctor from Ohio, settled with the lab company for $5,000 in order to protect his daughter's credit history. Julia Robinson for KHN hide caption

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Julia Robinson for KHN

How A Urine Test After Back Surgery Triggered A $17,850 Bill

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Andrew Lichtenstein/Getty Images

Scientists Edge Closer To A Blood Test To Detect Cancers

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These large capsules, which can be swallowed, measure three different gases as they traverse the gastrointestinal tract. Courtesy of Peter T. Clarke/RMIT University hide caption

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Courtesy of Peter T. Clarke/RMIT University

Mine Cicek, an assistant professor at the Mayo Clinic, processes samples for the All of Us program. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Richard Harris/NPR

Researchers Gather Health Data For 'All Of Us'

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Scientists have developed a smartphone app to measure sperm count at home. Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School hide caption

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Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

The hemoglobin A1C test for blood sugar, a standard assay for diabetes, may not perform as well in people with sickle cell trait, a study finds. fotostorm/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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fotostorm/Getty Images/iStockphoto

The A1C Blood Sugar Test May Be Less Accurate In African-Americans

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Stanford bioengineering professor Manu Prakash looked to a children's toy to create a hand-powered centrifuge for processing blood tests. Kurt Hickman /Stanford University hide caption

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Kurt Hickman /Stanford University

Children's Whirligig Toy Inspires a Low-Cost Laboratory Test

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A multi-million dollar effort to produce a test to guide treatment for a potentially lethal skin cancer recently fell apart after the scientific investigator discovered that the commercial antibodies he was using were unreliable. Cultura RM Exclusive/Peter Mulle/Getty Images hide caption

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Cultura RM Exclusive/Peter Mulle/Getty Images