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The Feed the Future Tworore Inkoko, Twunguke project hosts a meeting in the Gataraga sector of Rwanda to recruit farmers to grow chickens. If the farmers commit to four days of training and pass a competency test, they are given a backyard coop worth about $625, as well as the means to obtain 100 day-old chicks, vaccines, feed and technical advice. Emily Urban/NPR hide caption

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Emily Urban/NPR

A Palestinian woman and her children receive supplies from the International Committee of the Red Cross at a refugee camp in Gaza; a latrine project in Haiti financed by Oxfam; a UNICEF tent at a refugee camp in Iraq. Abid Katib/Getty Images; Jonathan Torgovnik/Getty Images; Florian Gaertner/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Abid Katib/Getty Images; Jonathan Torgovnik/Getty Images; Florian Gaertner/Photothek via Getty Images

People walk past the World Bank's headquarters in Washington, D.C. A watchdog says that the World Bank is not adequately monitoring how funds intended for Afghanistan reconstruction are being used. Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images

A man rides through Raqqa, Syria, on his motorbike. Michele Kelemen/NPR hide caption

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Michele Kelemen/NPR

'Immediate Needs' In Syria After ISIS: USAID Chief Visits Devastated Raqqa

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Development Ventures International was the first investor in Mera Gao Power, which has designed a solar-powered microgrid to provide electricity to off-grid villages in India. Anna da Costa/Courtesy of USAID hide caption

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Anna da Costa/Courtesy of USAID

The Gardez Hospital in Afghanistan's Paktia province as seen in 2012. The U.S.-funded hospital still has construction deficiencies nearly five years after the original target date for its completion. SIGAR hide caption

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SIGAR

The University of Toronto's solar-powered pond aerator could help fish farmers in Bangladesh earn up to $250 of extra income a year. Courtesy of Powering Agriculture and University of Toronto hide caption

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Courtesy of Powering Agriculture and University of Toronto

During an October visit to Liberia, USAID head Rajiv Shah held a joint press conference with the country's president, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

From Haiti's Earthquake To Ebola, He Had 5 Busy Years At USAID

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Community workers build an Ebola clinic on Nov. 8 in Lokomasama, near Port Loko, Sierra Leone. The community decided to organize and fight the disease — building a holding center for suspected cases, enforcing a travel ban. It created a $100 fine for a handshake and a $200 fine plus six months in jail for an illegal burial. Francisco Leong/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Francisco Leong/AFP/Getty Images

American USAID chief Rajiv Shah meets with Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf in Monrovia. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

USAID Head Speaks Of Heroic Efforts — And Heroes — In West Africa

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