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Tax season is more stressful this year for filers and IRS workers alike, because of new tax law changes and the partial government shutdown that has left the agency with roughly half its normal staff. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Shutdown Squeezes IRS Workers Just As The Tax-Filing Season Is About To Start

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For Furloughed Worker, Isolation, Hit To Self-Worth Hurt As Much As Lost Pay

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The White House says tax refund checks will go out despite the partial government shutdown. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Despite 70,000 Furloughed IRS Workers, White House Vows Refunds Will Be Issued

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The IRS has extended the filing deadline because of technical problems. Taxpayers now have until midnight Wednesday to file their returns or extension requests and pay their taxes. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

The IRS estimates that more than $65 million has been lost to phone tax scammers in the last five years. They're most active during high tax season in March and April. mihailomilovanovic/Getty Images hide caption

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mihailomilovanovic/Getty Images

As Tax Day Approaches, Watch Out For Phone Scammers

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Money deposited in a health savings account is tax-deductible, grows tax-free and can be used to pay for medical expenses. The annual maximum allowable contribution to an HSA is slightly lower for some people this year. Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Subjects RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Subjects RF/Getty Images

During the 2013 shutdown, tourists have to look at Mount Rushmore from the highway because the national memorial in Keystone, S.D., was closed. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Open Or Closed? Here's What Happens In A Partial Government Shutdown

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Now that Congress has passed the Republican tax bill, the IRS has a lot of work to do to prepare for the changes to the tax code. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Now That The GOP Tax Bill Is Approved, The IRS Gets Busy

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The IRS released preliminary figures that show about three-quarters of taxpayers indicated they had qualifying health insurance in 2014. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Lou Graham prepares taxes in Connecticut and is ready to answer client questions about the Affordable Care Act. Jeff Cohen/WNPR hide caption

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Jeff Cohen/WNPR

Tax Preparers Get Ready To Be Bearers Of Bad News About Health Law

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IRS Commissioner John Koskinen testifies Friday on Capitol Hill. Koskinen was asked to explain the disappearance of emails that could relate to a probe into the targeting of Tea Party groups. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP