genocide genocide

The idea behind "Musekeweya", or the New Dawn, is to do the opposite of what the government's notorious "hate radio" did 20 years ago as it stoked ethnic hatred during the genocide carried out by Hutu extremists. Stephanie Aglietti/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephanie Aglietti/AFP/Getty Images

Romeo & Juliet In Kigali: How A Soap Opera Sought To Change Behavior In Rwanda

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Patrick Desbois began investigating Nazi crimes because of his family history. His grandfather was deported to a work camp in Ukraine during World War II but never spoke about what had happened. "So I decided to go there one day," he says, "and that's when I discovered that the Germans shot at a minimum 18,000 Jews, plus gypsies, plus Soviet prisoners. But no one wanted to speak about it." Christophe Archambault/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Christophe Archambault/AFP/Getty Images

After Documenting Nazi Crimes, A French Priest Exposes ISIS Attacks On Yazidis

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Rohingya Muslim children, who crossed over from Myanmar into Bangladesh, wait squashed against each other to receive food handouts distributed to children and women by a Turkish aid agency at Thaingkhali refugee camp, Bangladesh, in October. Dar Yasin/AP hide caption

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Dar Yasin/AP

Myanmar's civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi gives a speech this month in Beijing. The U.N. human rights chief says she could be held responsible for her country's brutal treatment of the Rohingya. Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images

Thousands gather to celebrate Liberation Day in Shyira, Rwanda. Twenty-three years ago, a rebel army led by Paul Kagame, now the president, marched into Kigali to end a genocide against the Tutsi minority. Eyder Peralta/NPR hide caption

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Eyder Peralta/NPR

In Rwanda, July 4 Isn't Independence Day — It's Liberation Day

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Siblings Ibrahim and Evan visit the home of their aunt December 27 in Bakhdida, Iraq, southeast of Mosul. The Islamic state burned the home, looted their parents home and destroyed or vandalized every church in Bakhdida. With a population of 50,000, it had been the largest Christian-majority town in the country, but nearly all residents have fled. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Global Powers' Commitment To Intervene In Genocides May Be Waning

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Activists with a group that advocated for recognition of the Armenian genocide react at the German Parliament after lawmakers voted to recognize the Armenian genocide. The posters read, "#RecognitionNow says Thanks!" Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images

Bosnians Remember When Their City Became 'One Big Concentration Camp'

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A woman weeps as she visits the grave of a family member killed in the 1995 massacre at the Potocari memorial complex near Srebrenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, on Saturday. Marko Drobnjakovic/AP hide caption

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Marko Drobnjakovic/AP

Raphael Lemkin is the Polish lawyer and linguist who coined the term "genocide" — and dedicated his life to making genocide recognized as a crime. Copyright by Arthur Leipzig /Courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York hide caption

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Copyright by Arthur Leipzig /Courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

The Man Who Coined 'Genocide' Spent His Life Trying To Stop It

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Guatemala's former dictator Efrain Rios Montt arrives in court Jan. 31 in Guatemala City to stand trial on genocide charges. On Monday, his conviction was overturned. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP