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NASA astronaut Josh Cassada recently spoke to Short Wave Scientist in Residence Regina G. Barber from the International Space Station (ISS). As he orbited Earth, they discussed some of the science experiments happening aboard the ISS. The experiments span multiple scientific fields including physics and biology. NASA/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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NASA/Screenshot by NPR

What do astronauts do all day? We talked to one 250 miles above Earth to find out

Speaking to Short Wave from about 250 miles above the Earth, Josh Cassada outlined his typical day at work: "Today, I actually started out by taking my own blood," he said. The astronauts aboard the International Space Station are themselves research subjects, as well as conductors of all sorts of science experiments: Gardening in microgravity, trapping frigid atoms, examining neutron stars. Then, there's the joy of walks into the yawning void of space. Speaking from orbit, Cassada told fellow physicist and Short Wave Scientist in Residence Regina G. Barber about research aboard the station, what it takes to keep the ISS going and which countries' astronauts make the best food.

What do astronauts do all day? We talked to one 250 miles above Earth to find out

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Extravehicular crewmember 2 (EV2) Terry Virts is reflected in the helmet visor of EV1 Barry Wilmore during Extravehicular Activity 29 (EVA 29). Earth is in the background. Courtesy of NASA hide caption

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Courtesy of NASA

What It's Really Like To 'Walk' In Space

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