racial profiling racial profiling

In the aftermath of a police-involved shooting, there's often a familiar debate about what led to it. But research shows there's an underlying cause that we often miss. JASON REDMOND/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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JASON REDMOND/AFP/Getty Images

The 'Thumbprint Of The Culture': Implicit Bias And Police Shootings

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The "broken windows" theory of policing suggested that cleaning up the visible signs of disorder — like graffiti, loitering, panhandling and prostitution — would prevent more serious crime. Image Source/Getty Images hide caption

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How A Theory Of Crime And Policing Was Born, And Went Terribly Wrong

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Some People Are Great At Recognizing Faces. Others...Not So Much

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The broken windows theory of policing suggested that cleaning up the visible signs of disorder — like graffiti, loitering, panhandling and prostitution — would prevent more serious crime as well. Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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Getty Images/Image Source

How A Theory Of Crime And Policing Was Born, And Went Terribly Wrong

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Nextdoor CEO Nirav Tolia says a pilot project using algorithms to check for racially charged terms has helped cut racial profiling posts by roughly 50 percent. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Social Network Nextdoor Moves To Block Racial Profiling Online

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Dr. Brian Williams, a trauma surgeon at Parkland Memorial Hospital, poses for a photo at the hospital, Monday, July 11, 2016, in Dallas. Williams treated some of the Dallas police officers who were shot Thursday night in downtown Dallas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay) Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Treating The Police, Fearing The Police: Dallas Surgeon Brian Williams Reflects

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Kurt Britz checks a driver's license at the 3-D Denver Discrete Dispensary on Jan. 1, 2014, the first day recreational marijuana sales were legal in Colorado. Possession remains illegal for those under 21 years old, and statistics show a widening racial gap in arrests for those offenses. Theo Stroomer/Getty Images hide caption

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As Adults Legally Smoke Pot In Colorado, More Minority Kids Arrested For It

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Khairuldeen Makhzoomi (left) came to the U.S. as an Iraqi refugee and says he was recently unfairly removed from a flight. Haven Daley/AP hide caption

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'Flying While Muslim': Profiling Fears After Arabic Speaker Removed From Plane

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Raymond Smith of Charleston, S.C., kneels in prayer in front of the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston before a worship service on June 21. Stephen B. Morton/AP hide caption

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Stephen B. Morton/AP

Coping While Black: A Season Of Traumatic News Takes A Psychological Toll

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Rick Ector trains new gun owners at a range just outside of Detroit. He supports more African-Americans getting permits to carry concealed weapons. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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More African-Americans Support Carrying Legal Guns For Self-Defense

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Madison Mayor Paul Soglin addresses a crowd of protesters on Martin Luther King Boulevard in Madison, Wis., during a protest of the shooting death of Tony Robinson. Andy Manis/AP hide caption

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Racial Tension Draws Parallels, But Madison Is No Ferguson

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President Obama responds to a question from NPR's Steve Inskeep on Dec. 17 in the Oval Office. Mito Habe-Evans/NPR hide caption

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Here's Why Obama Said The U.S. Is 'Less Racially Divided'

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Justice Department Moves To Further Rein In Racial Profiling

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A TSA agent checks a bag at a security checkpoint area at Midway International Airport last month. The new federal government guidelines on racial and religious profiling won't apply to the TSA. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

The Quick Stop convenience store in Miami Gardens, Fla., was equipped with video cameras that recorded many questionable encounters and arrests by the police. The city's police chief resigned Wednesday. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

A crowd gathers at a press conference and rally in front of Manhattan federal court to vocalize their objection to the stop and frisk policy by the police Department Wednesday, March 27, 2013, in New York. The Center for Constitutional Rights has brought a lawsuit on behalf of four black plaintiffs who claim they were stopped by police because of their race. (AP Photo/ Louis Lanzano) Louis Lanzano/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Louis Lanzano/ASSOCIATED PRESS