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On her way to work at the Mazda Toyota Manufacturing plant in northern Alabama, D'Koya Mathis takes her 2-year-old daughter Zharia to Ms. Pat's Child Care & Development Center. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

An auto plant in Alabama is offering employees up to $250 per month for child care

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The pandemic shuttered day-care centers, after-school programs and camps this year, creating problems for some parents who put aside wages, pre-tax, to pay for those expenses. Lars Baron/Getty Images hide caption

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Lars Baron/Getty Images

Use It Or Lose It: Parents Set Wages Aside For Child Care. Now It's At Risk

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Joyce Chen, an associate professor of development economics at Ohio State University, has had to put her research on hold this year to oversee her children's virtual schooling. Chen is also teaching virtually this fall. Jessica Phelps for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Phelps for NPR

Even The Most Successful Women Pay A Big Price

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Sen. Tammy Duckworth walks across stage at the Democratic National Convention in 2016. She is the first senator to give birth while serving in office. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

A woman farmer makes hay bales in Kashmir, India. In India, women comprise about a third of the agricultural labor in developing countries. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Working Moms Have Been A 'Thing' Since Ancient History

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Lawmakers in the Kumamoto Municipal Assembly talk with member Yuka Ogata, who brought her infant son to work. The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Imag hide caption

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The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Imag

Japanese Lawmaker's Baby Gets Booted From The Floor

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Clara Sunderland was recently born in southern California. Her mom, Wendy, says a breast-feeding support group on Facebook has been crucial to learning how to breast-feed. Courtesy of Wendy Sunderland hide caption

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Courtesy of Wendy Sunderland

Dawn Heisey-Grove of Alexandria, Va., hands off son Zane to father Jonathan Heisey-Grove after a midday feeding. The couple were both working full time when Jonathan lost his job as a graphic designer two years ago. She's a public health analyst. He's now a stay-at-home dad. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR