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Babies of moms who are in the ICU with severe flu have a greater chance of being born premature and underweight. Nenov/Getty Images hide caption

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Nenov/Getty Images

Severe Flu Raises Risk Of Birth Problems For Pregnant Women, Babies

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Randy and Karen O'Burke together at their son's home in Hendersonville, Tenn., last week. "Apparently, I'm pretty much of a miracle," Randy says. Morgan Hornsby for NPR hide caption

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Morgan Hornsby for NPR

How To Prevent Brain-Sapping Delirium In The ICU

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While Baby Duke Brothers stayed in the NICU, his parents could watch over him via web cam. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Cameras On Preemies Let In Families, Keep Germs Out

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Rosemary Grant is a registered nurse and helps coordinate sepsis care at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. The center's goal, she says, is to get a patient who might be developing sepsis antibiotics within three hours. Ian C. Bates for NPR hide caption

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Ian C. Bates for NPR

Synergy Between Nurses And Automation Could Be Key To Finding Sepsis Early

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Kristopher Kelly near his home in Concrete, Wash., in February. He broke his pelvis and all his ribs in a work accident last year. The resulting infection he developed in the hospital almost killed him. Ian C. Bates for NPR hide caption

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Ian C. Bates for NPR

Did An IV Cocktail Of Vitamins And Drugs Save This Lumberjack From Sepsis?

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Two-year-old Robbie Klein has hemophilia, a medical condition that interferes with his blood's ability to clot normally. Without insurance, the daily medications he needs to stay healthy could cost hundreds of thousands of dollars or more each year. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

In Massachusetts, Proposed Medicaid Cuts Put Kids' Health Care At Risk

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As baby boomers age, more older Americans are visiting the emergency room, which can be an overcrowded, disorienting and even traumatic place. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Of the million or so Americans a year who get sepsis, roughly 300,000 die. Unfortunately, many treatments for the condition have looked promising in small, preliminary studies, only to fail in follow-up research. Reptile8488/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Reptile8488/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Doctor Turns Up Possible Treatment For Deadly Sepsis

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Kate Teague, a registered nurse at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, in Palo Alto, Calif., holds a premature baby's hand. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

In Caring For Sickest Babies, Doctors Now Tap Parents For Tough Calls

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Omar looks through Kai's photo book. The charges for the infant's six months of care in the neonatal intensive care unit totaled about $11 million, according to the family, though their insurer very likely negotiated a lower rate. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/KHN

An Ill Newborn, A Loving Family And A Litany Of Wrenching Choices

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Hospital intensive care units save lives, but people there often suffer from delirium. Cal EMA / Flickr hide caption

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Cal EMA / Flickr

To fight antibiotic-resistant staph germs like these, a study suggests disinfecting the skin of all intensive care patients. Janice Carr/CDC hide caption

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Janice Carr/CDC