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Could woolly mammoths walk again among humans? Scientists are working to resurrect the extinct species. Mark Garlick/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Mark Garlick/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

Scientists take a step closer to resurrecting the woolly mammoth

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Julius Csotonyi

According to a recent study in the journal Cell, plants that are distressed due to factors like dehydration and cuts, emit specific airborne sounds at an increased frequency. Tuvik Beker/Tel Aviv University hide caption

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Tuvik Beker/Tel Aviv University

Jaquel Spivey performs as Usher in A Strange Loop at Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company in Washington D.C. Teresa Castracane/Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company in Association with Playwrights Horizons and Page 73 Productions hide caption

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Teresa Castracane/Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company in Association with Playwrights Horizons and Page 73 Productions

A Pulitzer winner at the worst possible time, 'A Strange Loop' is Broadway-bound

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An artist's impression of a woolly mammoth in a snow-covered environment. Leonello Calvetti/Stocktrek Images/Getty Images/Stocktrek Images hide caption

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Leonello Calvetti/Stocktrek Images/Getty Images/Stocktrek Images

Last year, China banned the sale of commercial elephant ivory to stop poaching. That's when interest in ancient, buried woolly mammoth tusks boomed. Amos Chapple/RFE/RL hide caption

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Amos Chapple/RFE/RL

Woolly Mammoths Are Long Gone, But The Hunt For Their Ivory Tusks Lives On

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(Left) A close-up view of a spirally fractured mastodon femur. (Right) A boulder discovered at the Cerutti Mastodon site in San Diego County thought to have been used by early humans as a hammerstone. Tom Démeré/San Diego Natural History Museum hide caption

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Tom Démeré/San Diego Natural History Museum

New Evidence Suggests Humans Arrived In The Americas Far Earlier Than Thought

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Woolly mammoths depended on tiny flowering plants for protein. Did the decline of the flowers cause their extinction? Per Möller/Johanna Anjar hide caption

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Per Möller/Johanna Anjar

Woolly Mammoths' Taste For Flowers May Have Been Their Undoing

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A file photo from 2011 shows a man touching a giant bronze sculpture of a mammoth in the Siberian city of Khanty-Mansiysk. A team of Russian and South Korean scientists who found a well-preserved frozen woolly mammoth carcass this month say it also included blood. Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP/Getty Images