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A contractor, who federal prosecutors say stole classified information from government agencies, including the National Security Agency, pleaded guilty on Thursday. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Army Gen. Paul Nakasone, who leads the National Security Agency and U.S. Cyber Command, testifies on Capitol Hill in January. Nakasone has been calling for the U.S. to take a harder line against rivals in cyberspace. He said the U.S. sent three Cyber Command teams to Europe last November as part of a larger effort to prevent Russian interference in mid-term elections. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

The U.S. Pledges A Harder Line In Cyberspace — And Drops Some Hints

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Rob Storch, who became inspector general of the NSA this year, says he believes the agency should have a "robust whistleblower program." Courtesy of NSA hide caption

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Courtesy of NSA

From Inside The NSA, A Call For More Whistleblowers

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Adm. Michael Rogers, chief of the U.S. Cyber Command and director of the National Security Agency, testifies before the Senate Armed Services Committee on Tuesday. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

NSA Chief: U.S. Response 'Hasn't Changed The Calculus' Of Russian Interference

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A laptop in the Netherlands was one of hundreds of thousands infected by ransomware in May. The malware reportedly originated with the NSA. Rob Engelaar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rob Engelaar/AFP/Getty Images

Former National Intelligence Director James Clapper testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, before the Senate Judiciary subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism hearing: "Russian Interference in the 2016 United States Election," in May. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Reality Leigh Winner, 25, has been accused by the U.S. Department of Justice of sending classified material to a news organization. Via Reuters hide caption

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Via Reuters

What We Know About Reality Winner, Government Contractor Accused Of NSA Leak

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FBI Director James Comey and National Security Agency Director Mike Rogers testify during the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence hearing on Russian actions during the 2016 election campaign. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

William Evanina, the head of U.S. counterintelligence, estimates that more than 100 Russian spies are currently operating on U.S. soil. Courtesy of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence hide caption

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Courtesy of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence

For America's Top Spy Catcher, A World Of Problems To Fix — And Prevent

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This image released by Open Road Films shows, from left, Melissa Leo as Laura Poitras, Joseph Gordon-Levitt as Edward Snowden, Tom Wilkinson as Ewen MacAskill and Zachary Quinto as Glenn Greenwald, in a scene from "Snowden." Jürgen Olczyk/AP hide caption

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Jürgen Olczyk/AP

A Former NSA Deputy Director Weighs In On 'Snowden'

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U.S. Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter, shown here at the Pentagon in March, has said the "new breed of warrior" — cyberwarriors — will be expected to fight just as hard as their colleagues on conventional battlefields. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Rules For Cyberwarfare Still Unclear, Even As U.S. Engages In It

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