National Security Agency National Security Agency

Edward Snowden is shown during a live broadcast from Moscow at the CeBIT in Hanover, Germany, in March. On Friday, Snowden said a federal court ruling against the NSA program that he revealed was "extraordinarily encouraging." Ole Spata/DPA/Landov hide caption

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Ole Spata/DPA/Landov

Not many students have the cutting-edge cybersecurity skills the NSA needs, recruiters say. And these days industry is paying top dollar for talent. Brooks Kraft/Corbis hide caption

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Brooks Kraft/Corbis

After Snowden, The NSA Faces Recruitment Challenge

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After a car attempted to crash a gate outside the NSA Monday morning, Maryland state police blocked the freeway entrance that accesses the agency's headquarters in Fort Meade, Md. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

The lawsuit by Wikimedia and other plaintiffs challenges the National Security Agency's use of upstream surveillance, which collects the content of communications, instead of just the metadata. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

An 'Upstream' Battle As Wikimedia Challenges NSA Surveillance

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Court Documents Show How NSA Leaned On Yahoo, How Yahoo Fought Back

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This photo provided by The Guardian in London shows Edward Snowden, who worked as a contract employee at the National Security Agency, in Hong Kong last year. AP hide caption

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AP

Big Data Firm Says It Can Link Snowden Data To Changed Terrorist Behavior

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Director of National Intelligence James Clapper (center), accompanied by FBI Director Robert Mueller (left) and CIA Director John Brennan, testifies on Capitol Hill on March 12, 2013. When questioned, Clapper said the NSA did not collect data on Americans. He later acknowledged his response was "clearly erroneous." Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

The Challenge Of Keeping Tabs On The NSA's Secretive Work

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