water water

A Madison Water Utility Crew works to dig up and replace a broken water shutoff box in preparation for a larger pipe-lining project. Madison started using copper instead of lead pipes in the late 1920s. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

Avoiding A Future Crisis, Madison Removed Lead Water Pipes 15 Years Ago

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Virginia Tech students from professor Marc Edwards' lab and other student volunteers work on a second round of water testing for lead contamination in Elnora Carthan's home in Flint, Mich. Maggie Carolan is working with samples at the table. Logan Wallace/Virginia Tech hide caption

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Logan Wallace/Virginia Tech

Flint Residents Tired Of Talk And Tests, Eager For Solution

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Third-graders Ezekiel White (right) and Emanuel Black push a jug of water to the cafeteria at Southwest Baltimore Charter School. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Jennifer Ludden/NPR

Before Flint, Lead-Contaminated Water Plagued Schools Across U.S.

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This is one of several canals that will be filled to slow the movement of water through the Everglades, restoring an ecosystem environmentalist Marjory Stoneman Douglas called the "river of grass."€ Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Once Parched, Florida's Everglades Finds Its Flow Again

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Saudi Hay Farm In Arizona Tests State's Supply Of Groundwater

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The city of Fort Bragg, Calif., has ordered restaurants to drastically reduce the amount of dishwashing by serving customers with disposable plates, cups and flatware. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Emily Bogle/NPR