Frederick Douglass Frederick Douglass
Stories About

Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass visited Ireland in 1845 to drum up support for abolition. That launched generations of solidarity between Black civil rights and Irish republican activists. Jackie Lay/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jackie Lay/NPR
Kaz Fantone

A painting by artist Sidney King depicting a Dutch ship with 20 enslaved African people arriving at Point Comfort, VA in 1619, marking the beginning of slavery in America. Sidney King/Associated Press hide caption

toggle caption
Sidney King/Associated Press

An undated photo of abolitionist Frederick Douglass. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Frederick Douglass Documents, Newly Acquired By Yale, Reveal 'Hope For The Country'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/890495525/890498371" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A statue of the abolitionist and writer Frederick Douglass, pictured here, was torn from its base in Rochester, N.Y., on the anniversary of his famous speech "What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?" AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

A portrait of 19th-century abolitionist Frederick Douglass is unveiled at the Maryland governor's residence in Annapolis on Sept. 15, 2014. Brian Witte/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Brian Witte/AP

The Frederick Douglass Statue in Emancipation Hall at the U.S. Capitol in 2013. On July 3, the National Archives hosted a reading of Douglass' essay about the Fourth of July. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

American writer, abolitionist and orator Frederick Douglass edits a journal at his desk, late 1870s. Douglass was acutely conscious of being a literary witness to the inhumane institution of slavery he had escaped as a young man. He made sure to document his life in not one but three autobiographies. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hulton Archive/Getty Images