gaming gaming

Horatio Monroe of Tracy, Calif., comes to PLAYlive Nation to play Fortnite every day after work. He says it relaxes him. Adhiti Bandlamudi/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Adhiti Bandlamudi/Capital Public Radio

The Fortnite Craze Might Be Here To Stay

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Young women cosplay as the main characters of the mobile game Arena of Valor in Tianjin, China, in October. More than half the game's players in China are female. Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images

China's Most Popular Mobile Game Charges Into American Market

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Electronic Arts is one of the video game makers facing a strike from voice actors. Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Voice Actors Strike Against Video Game Companies

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Saudi Independent developers showcasing their games at GCON2015. Courtesy of Ashwag Bandar hide caption

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Courtesy of Ashwag Bandar

For Young Saudi Women, Video Games Offer Self-Expression

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An attendee at the Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles plays Sony's Project Morpheus London Heist video game with a virtual reality headset and Move controllers. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov

Gaming Industry Pushes Virtual Reality, But Content Lags

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Cameo Stevens, 35, plays Mike Tyson's Punch-Out! at Save Point Video Games in Charlotte, N.C. The market for old video games of the '80s and '90s has seen a surge in recent years. Ben Bradford/WFAE hide caption

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Ben Bradford/WFAE

Businesses Offer A Link To The Past For Lovers Of Old Video Games

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