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Democrat Dan McCready (left) and Republican Mark Harris are the candidates at the center of a contested race to represent North Carolina's 9th Congressional District. The state is investigating claims that a GOP operative may have manipulated ballots. Chuck Burton/AP hide caption

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Chuck Burton/AP

New Hampshire secretary of state Bill Gardner, left, shows former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, the historic ballot box before O'Malley filed papers to run in the 2016 presidential primary. Gardner is the nation's longest-serving secretary of state and has jealously guarded New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation presidential primary. Jim Cole/AP hide caption

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Jim Cole/AP

Then-Georgia Secretary of State, and Republican nominee for governor, Brian Kemp attends an election night event in Athens, Georgia. As secretary of state, Kemp was charged with overseeing the election logistics for the election he was running in. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Georgia voters at an Atlanta high school on Nov. 6, 2018. Voting issues became a central issue in the hotly contested governor's race between Republican Brian Kemp and Democrat Stacey Abrams. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Democrat Stacey Abrams isn't backing down from her fight against what she calls voter suppression tactics and election mismanagement after losing the Georgia governor's race. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Stacey Abrams Says She Was Almost Blocked From Voting In Georgia Election

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Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp has declared victory in a closely-fought race with Democrat Stacey Abrams that included accusations he abused his office to win the election. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Jessica Jones (center) speaks to people gathered around the Ben & Jerry's "Yes on 4" Truck about Florida's Amendment 4 initiative at Charles Hadley Park in Miami, on Oct. 22. Amendment 4 asked voters to restore the voting rights of people with past felony convictions. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

North Carolina will join Virginia and 17 other states that require voters to show a photo ID to vote. A sign notifies voters that a photo ID is required at the Clarke County Schools office polling location in Berryville, Va., on Nov. 6, 2018. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc./Getty Images

Gaston County Elections Director Adam Ragan tests equipment. Alexandra Olgin/WFAE hide caption

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Alexandra Olgin/WFAE

Early Voting Changes In North Carolina Spark Bipartisan Controversy

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More than 150,000 Floridians had their voting rights restored during former Gov. Charlie Crist's four years in office. In the seven years since then, current Gov. Rick Scott has approved restoring voting rights to just over 3,000 people. VisionsofAmerica/Joe Sohm/Getty Images hide caption

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VisionsofAmerica/Joe Sohm/Getty Images

Felons In Florida Want Their Voting Rights Back Without A Hassle

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People wait in line to enter the U.S. Supreme Court, on April 23, 2018. There's less than a month left in the Court's term and many of the most controversial and contentious cases will be decided in the coming weeks. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Signs sit behind the podium before the start of a press conference in New York City about the multi-state lawsuit to block the Trump administration from adding a question about citizenship to the 2020 census form. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Florida Gov. Rick Scott at a news conference in May in Miami. A decision by a federal judge to strike down the state's procedure for restoring voting rights to felons who have served their time is seen as a defeat for the governor. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Florida law permanently strips felons of the right to vote and other civil rights, including serving on a jury, running for public office and sitting for the state bar exam. Getty Images hide caption

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Trump's Election Integrity Commission Could Have A 'Chilling Effect' On Voting Rights

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A polling station in Virginia during the state's primary election in March 2016. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Despite Little Evidence Of Fraud, White House Launches Voting Commission

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A federal panel ruled Friday that three of Texas's Congressional districts, including the 35th, shown here, were illegally drawn by the state's Republicans. Screengrab by NPR/Google Maps hide caption

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Screengrab by NPR/Google Maps