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food psychology

Would you eat a cricket? Parth Shah hide caption

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Parth Shah

Yum and Yuck: The Psychology Of What We Eat...And What We Spit Out

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Brian Wansink demonstrates his "bottomless bowl of soup" — used to show that people eat more when served in a bowl secretly replenished from the inside — after he was awarded a 2007 Ig Nobel Prize in 2007 at Harvard University. Wansink made a name for himself producing pithy, palatable studies that connected people's eating habits with cues from their environment. Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images
GraphicaArtis/Getty Images

Hungry, Hungry Hippocampus: Why and How We Eat

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Color really does impact our perception of taste — even if the ingredients are otherwise the same, scientists say. It's something candy companies use to their advantage. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Would having to wait 25 seconds for your snack prompt you to make healthier choices at the vending machine? New research suggests the answer is yes. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Environmental cues — like the color, size and shape of the dinnerware, the music playing in the background and the lighting in the dining room — can alter how we experience food and drink. For example, research suggests that serving food on a red plate tends to reduce the amount diners eat. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Cheese might take on a whole new flavor when you use a plastic utensil. Elizabeth Willing/Courtesy Flavour hide caption

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Elizabeth Willing/Courtesy Flavour

Your Choice In Utensils Can Change How Food Tastes

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