Anthony Kennedy Anthony Kennedy

Abortion-rights supporters in Seattle protest on Tuesday against President Trump and his choice of federal appeals Judge Brett Kavanaugh as his second nominee to the Supreme Court. Activists are preparing for the possibility that Kavanaugh's confirmation could weaken abortion rights. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Abortion Rights Advocates Preparing For Life After Roe v. Wade

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Rev. Brad Wells, left, Rev. Patrick Mahoney and Paula Oas, kneel in prayer in front of the Supreme Court in December as justices hear arguments in the Masterpiece Cakeshop case. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Trump Says He's Not Asking Justice Candidates About Abortion. Why Bother?

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Abortion-rights proponents protest outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday. The retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy set the stage for a battle over abortion rights unlike any in a generation. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

What Justice Kennedy's Retirement Means For Abortion Rights

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Justice Anthony Kennedy, seen here during congressional testimony in 2015, has played a pivotal role on the Supreme Court since he was sworn in 30 years ago. Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday that when there is clear evidence of racial bias during jury deliberations, they can be unsealed by a court to investigate whether the defendant's rights were violated. Joe Burbank/AP hide caption

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Joe Burbank/AP

Gay rights advocates John Lewis (left), and his spouse Stuart Gaffney kiss across the street from City Hall in San Francisco, on Friday following a ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court that same-sex couples have the right to marry nationwide. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Supreme Court Changes Face Of Marriage In Historic Ruling

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