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Mike Hollinger of IBM joined a group of business leaders at a news conference on the steps of the capitol in Austin, Texas. The business leaders oppose the so-called religious refusal laws currently under consideration in the Texas legislature. Susan Risdon/Red Media Group hide caption

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Susan Risdon/Red Media Group

Business Leaders Oppose 'License To Discriminate' Against LGBT Texans

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A new study finds that up to 20 percent of the LGBT population in this country live in rural America. For the most part, they chose that life for the same reasons others do: tight-knit communities with a shared sense of values. Roy Hsu/Getty Images/Uppercut RF hide caption

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Roy Hsu/Getty Images/Uppercut RF

Michelle Sherman found an unexpected LGBT ally when she came out — her 93-year-old grandmother, Alice Palmer. Michelle Sherman/NPR hide caption

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Michelle Sherman/NPR

LGBT Navajos Discover Unexpected Champions: Their Grandparents

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Sarah Spiegel, a third-year student at New York Medical College, pushed for more education on LGBT health issues for students. Mengwen Cao for NPR hide caption

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Mengwen Cao for NPR

A group of mostly LGBT Central American migrants are the first to reach northern Mexico. On Sunday about 80 of them arrived in Tijuana. They plan to apply for asylum as early as Thursday. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

After winning Kansas' 3rd District, Sharice Davids is projected to become one of the first Native American women to serve in Congress and the first LGBTQ person to represent the state in the lawmaking body. Whitney Curtis/Getty Images hide caption

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Whitney Curtis/Getty Images

Joel Edgerton stars as the head of a "conversion therapy" program in Boy Erased, which he also directs. Focus Features hide caption

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Focus Features

A 'Hopeful Story' Within Gay Conversion Therapy Drama 'Boy Erased'

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Sherry Vine (from left), Jackie Beat, Lady Bunny and Bianca Del Rio open up the show. "To be here now is quite fun," Del Rio said. "I remember as a young child, I had a videotape of Wigstock." Mengwen Cao for NPR hide caption

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Mengwen Cao for NPR

From left: Kenyan director Wanuri Kahiu and actors Samantha Mugatsia and Sheila Munyiva at the Cannes Film Festival. Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images

'Rafiki': The Lesbian Love Story That Kenya Banned And Then Unbanned

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Despite a ban on same-sex intercourse, India has a discreet gay scene in cosmopolitan centers, including at the Lalit hotel, where Rani Ko-He-Nur attends a drag night. The hotel's executive director is one of the plaintiffs in a Supreme Court case seeking to overturn the ban. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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Furkan Latif Khan/NPR

India's LGBTQ Activists Await Supreme Court Verdict On Same-Sex Intercourse Ban

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Ahmed Alaa, shown here in Cairo, spent three months in prison for raising a rainbow flag at the concert of a Lebanese band in Cairo last year. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

After Crackdown, Egypt's LGBT Community Contemplates 'Dark Future'

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Gov. Mary Fallin vetoed a bill allowing adults to carry firearms without a license and signed a bill to let private agencies deny placing a child for adoption based on religious beliefs. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Wendy Becker (left) and Mary Norton of Providence, R.I., raise their hands after the 2006 Massachusetts court ruling that allowed same-sex couples from Rhode Island to marry in Massachusetts. For the 2020 census, the couple can choose the new response category for "same-sex husband/wife/spouse." Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Boston Globe/Getty Images

2020 Census Will Ask About Same-Sex Relationships

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Calvin College in Michigan is affiliated with the Christian Reformed Church, which holds that "homosexual practice ... is incompatible with obedience to the will of God as revealed in Scripture." Noah PreFontaine/Calvin College hide caption

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Noah PreFontaine/Calvin College

Christian Colleges Are Tangled In Their Own LGBT Policies

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RuPaul, host of RuPaul's Drag Race All Stars, says the show isn't intentionally setting out to change minds; its goal is just to entertain and celebrate drag. Joseph Longo/AP hide caption

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Joseph Longo/AP

'Flats Are For Quitters': RuPaul Talks Drag, 'All Stars' And Identity Politics

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Skier Gus Kenworthy speaks during the 100 Days Out 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics Celebration with Team USA in November. Mike Stobe/Getty Images for USOC hide caption

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Mike Stobe/Getty Images for USOC

Abdul Kadr and Artur fled their homes in Chechnya because of their sexuality and are now living in the Netherlands. Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/NPR

Chechnya's LGBT Muslim Refugees Struggle To Cope In Exile

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