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Nicaragua

A motorcyclist rides past a mural of Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega, left, and revolutionary hero César Augusto Sandino during general elections in Managua, Nov. 7, 2021. Ortega won a fourth consecutive term against a field of little-known candidates while those who could have given him a real challenge sat in jail. Andres Nunes/AP hide caption

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Andres Nunes/AP

I returned to Nicaragua, where I was born, and found a country steeped in fear

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A couple in a motorcycle ride in front of a billboard with a picture of Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega at Ministry of Family Economy in Managua, Nicaragua. Getty Images/Getty Images hide caption

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A rare look into Nicaragua, a country that shuts itself off to journalists

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Nicaraguan Catholic Bishop Rolando Alvarez speaks to the press at the Santo Cristo de Esquipulas church in Managua, on May 20, 2022. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Opinion: A bishop of immense courage

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An image of Bishop Rolando Álvarez is pinned to a robe on a statue of Jesus Christ at the Cathedral in Matagalpa, Nicaragua, on Friday. Nicaraguan police on Friday raided Alvarez's residence, detaining him and several other priests in an escalation of tensions between the Catholic Church and the government of Daniel Oretga. Inti Ocon/AP hide caption

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Inti Ocon/AP

Nicaragua's President Daniel Ortega and his wife, Vice President Rosario Murillo, lead a rally in the capital Managua in 2018. Alfredo Zuniga/AP hide caption

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Alfredo Zuniga/AP

Nicaraguan author Sergio Ramirez in 2017 upon receiving the Cervantes Prize literary award. Prosecutors have ordered Ramirez' arrest along with other opponents of President Daniel Ortega. Alfredo Zuniga/AP hide caption

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Alfredo Zuniga/AP

Cristiana Chamorro, pre-presidential candidate, gives a press conference in Nicaragua's capital, Managua, in May after the detention of two of her former employees by the national police and their retention for 90 days for alleged laundering of assets. Inti Ocon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Inti Ocon/AFP via Getty Images

A man walks by a mobile health clinic displaying a picture of Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega (right) and his wife and vice president, Rosario Murillo, in Managua on April 14, 2020. The government claims to be successfully combating the pandemic but health workers and critics say the toll is likely higher. Inti Ocon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Inti Ocon/AFP via Getty Images

Citizens Work To Expose COVID's Real Toll In Nicaragua As Leaders Claim Success

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Two hurricanes destroyed bridges, roads, schools, health clinics and homes. Here is the aftermath in Protección in Honduras' Santa Barbara department on Dec. 11. Edison Umanzur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Edison Umanzur/AFP via Getty Images

Even Disaster Veterans Are Stunned By What's Happening In Honduras

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A truck flounders in a flooded street in Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua, just hours before Hurricane Iota made landfall in the country Monday night. By Tuesday morning, the storm had significantly weakened, but it still poses life-threatening dangers for residents in its path. Getty Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Navy members help evacuate people on a boat from the Karata and Wawa Bar communities ahead of the arrival of Hurricane Iota in Bilwi, Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua, on Sunday. STR/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP via Getty Images

Men walk along a flooded road Wednesday in Toyos, Honduras, after heavy rains from Eta caused a river to overflow. Orlando Sierra/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Sierra/AFP via Getty Images

A man rides a bike trough a street with trees fallen by heavy winds of Hurricane Eta on Tuesday in Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua. Getty Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Satellite imagery of Hurricane Eta. It was upgraded to a major hurricane by the National Hurricane Center on Monday. It is expected to dump 35 inches of rain in some isolated areas of Nicaragua after making landfall. NOAA hide caption

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NOAA

José Alberto "Chepe" Idiáquez, a Catholic priest and rector at a private Jesuit university in Nicaragua, has become an outspoken critic of Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega. Carlos Herrera hide caption

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Carlos Herrera

'Pray For Me': Nicaraguan Priest Threatened With Death Reaches Out To Niece In U.S.

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Relatives and friends attend the burial of teenager Matt Romero in Managua, Nicaragua, last September. He was shot dead during clashes between anti-government protesters and riot police and paramilitaries. Inti Ocon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Inti Ocon/AFP/Getty Images

Stay Or Go? Ortega's Crackdown Pushes Nicaraguans To Make Hard Choices

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