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Caregiver Fajriya Khaled holds a child at an orphanage in northeastern Syria, home to 41 children of Yazidi mothers and ISIS fathers. The Yazidi community in Iraq forces the women to leave their children behind if they want to return home. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

In Syria, An Orphanage Cares For Children Born To Yazidi Mothers Enslaved By ISIS

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These teenage brothers live in house #9 at the SOS Children's Village in Tela, Honduras. The goal isn't to get them adopted out but to create a family-like setting in the institution. Adriana Zehbrauskas for NPR hide caption

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Adriana Zehbrauskas for NPR

An Orphanage In Honduras Puts Love At The Top Of Its Priority List

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This particular Mosul orphanage holds 18 children under the age of 6, some of them the abandoned children of Yazidi women kidnapped by Islamic State fighters. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Kidnapped, Abandoned Children Turn Up At Mosul Orphanage As ISIS Battle Ends

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Kawkab walks with a social worker in the Dabaga camp for displaced Iraqis. Kawkab says she was seven or eight when she saw ISIS militants shoot her mother dead. "They shot her with an assault rifle," she says. "They shot her and she died and they threw her off the bridge. I asked them, 'Why did you kill her? She's my mother. She didn't do anything.'" Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Traumatized And Vulnerable To Abuse, Orphans From Mosul Are 'Living In Another World'

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For Russian Kids, A Disability Often Means Life In An Orphanage

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A girl cries outside an Ebola treatment center in Monrovia in late September. Both her parents died in the Ebola outbreak. Zoom Dosso /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Zoom Dosso /AFP/Getty Images

After Losing Parents To Ebola, Orphans Face Stigma

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