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Empty baby beds stand in the maternity ward of a hospital (a spokesperson for the hospital asked that the hospital not be named). Six days after Farai Chideya took her adopted newborn child home from a hospital, she was forced to give him back to his birth mother. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel, pictured earlier this month, has settled a lawsuit by same-sex couples who argued their rights were violated by faith-based adoption agencies that don't want to work with gays and lesbians. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

"We would not be able to foster without Medicaid," says Sherri Croom of Tallahassee, Fla. Croom and her husband, Thomas, have fostered 27 children in the past decade. They're pictured here with four adopted children, two 18-year-old former foster daughters and those daughters' sons. Courtesy of the Croom family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Croom family

Kelly Zimmerman holds her son Jaxton Wright at a parenting session at the Children's Health Center in Reading, Pa. The free program provides resources and social support to new parents in recovery from addiction, or who are otherwise vulnerable. Natalie Piserchio for NPR hide caption

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Natalie Piserchio for NPR

Beyond Opioids: How A Family Came Together To Stay Together

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Amanda Williammee and her daughter Taycee. Now a happy preschooler, the little girl was born with neonatal abstinence syndrome — a condition that includes opioid withdrawal symptoms like tremors, irritability, sleep problems and high-pitched crying. Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN

For Babies Of The Opioid Crisis, Best Care May Be Mom's Recovery

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Maria Luis (center) with her children Angie and Daniel on the day they were reunited in 2011. The children spent five years in the foster system after federal immigration officials sent Luis back to her native Guatemala. Courtesy of Omar Riojas hide caption

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Courtesy of Omar Riojas

When Immigration Detention Means Losing Your Kids

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Darrow Brown, 52, and Juan Calvo, 55, live in Baltimore. The men started fostering children after volunteering to take care of drug-addicted infants in 2007. Courtesy of StoryCorps hide caption

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Courtesy of StoryCorps

2 Dads And Their Experience With Foster Fatherhood

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In one of the few photos Anaya has from his time in foster care, he's pictured at age 4 in the backyard of one of his many foster homes. Courtesy of Noel Anaya hide caption

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Courtesy of Noel Anaya

After 20 Years, Young Man Leaves Foster Care On His Own Terms

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Hearing Officer Jim Teal presides over a session of Early Intervention Family Drug Court in Sacramento, Calif., in March. The county program helps keep families together — and saves taxpayers $7 million annually, Sacramento County officials say. Robert Durell for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Robert Durell for Kaiser Health News

California Court Helps Kids By Healing Parents' Addictions

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Juana Zacharias, 18, lives in a group home for foster children in Oxnard, Calif. She came out as transgender when she was 10; she entered the foster care system when she was 11, after her father was killed. Leo Duran/KPCC hide caption

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Leo Duran/KPCC

Los Angeles Pioneers Program To Help Educate Foster Parents For LGBT Kids

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A young boy talks with Tina Cloer, director of the Children's Bureau, in Indianapolis. The nonprofit shelter takes in children from the state's Department of Child Services when a suitable foster family can't be found. Cloer says the average length of stay at the shelter has increased from two days to 10 in 2015. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media

Heroin, Opioid Abuse Put Extra Strain On U.S. Foster Care System

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Laticia Aossey was hospitalized while a student at the University of Northern Iowa when she realized she hadn't signed up for health insurance. Matthew Putney/Courtesy of Youth Today hide caption

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Matthew Putney/Courtesy of Youth Today

Of the roughly 40 houses currently rented in Hope Meadows in Rantou, Ill., 10 are occupied by families who've adopted children from foster care. The rest are occupied by older adults who volunteer to help them. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Ina Jaffe/NPR

A Community Built Around Older Adults Caring For Adoptive Families

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